Did the teacher create a fake Facebook page? | School News

Did an ISD Fort Bend teacher create a fake Facebook page in his principal’s name in order to get the school principal in trouble?

Aaron Wempe is accused of creating a fake Facebook page in Len Brogan’s name with the intent to cause Brogan grief, according to the indictment.

Wempe is also accused of emailing the FBISD superintendent on behalf of the director in hopes of getting him in hot water.

A Fort Bend County grand jury indicted Wempe on two counts of impersonating someone else’s online identity or using a false name to create a social media page and impersonating another person in an email in hopes of causing trouble, each a third-degree felony punishable by up to 10 years in prison.

The indictments do not shed light on a possible motive or whether the two men knew each other. However, at the time, there was a teacher at Ridge Point High School named Aaron Wempe and a school principal named Len Brogan.

Wembe is specifically accused of sending an email to then-Superintendent Charles Dupre on October 8, 2020, on behalf of Leonard Brogan with the intention of having Dupre reasonably believe that Brogan sent the email and that it was Wempe’s intention to cause trouble. between Brogan and Dupré.

Wempe also apparently created a fake Facebook page in Brogan’s name with the intention of causing Brogan grief, according to the indictment.

Neither indictment specified details of the email or what the fake Facebook page said.

A January 27, 2019 post on Ridge Point High School’s Twitter account includes a photo of three teachers, one of whom is named A. Wempe and the “RateMyTeacher” website lists an Aaron Wempe as a teacher at Ridge Point High School.

The indictment does not specify the motive for the email and fake Facebook account other than to say Wempe intended to cause harm.

Fort Bend ISD investigated the complaints.

The indictments may well be the first of their kind handed down in Fort Bend County.

Online identity theft is an offense under Sec. 33.07 of the Texas Penal Code.

“A person commits an offense if he, without obtaining the consent of the other person and with the intent to harm, defraud, intimidate or threaten another person, uses the name or likeness of another person for :

(1) create a webpage on a commercial social networking site or other website;

or (2) post or send one or more messages on or through a commercial social networking site or other Internet site, other than on or through an electronic messaging program or message board program. (

(b) A person commits an offense if they send an email, instant message, text message, or similar communication that references a name, domain address, phone number, or other identifier belonging to any anybody :

(1) without obtaining the consent of the other person;

(2) with the intent to cause the recipient of the communication to reasonably believe that the other person authorized or transmitted the communication;

and (3) with the intent to harm or defraud any person.

The current Texas law is as follows:

1(a) A person commits an offense if he, without obtaining the consent of the other person and with intent to harm, defraud, intimidate or threaten another person, uses the name or likeness of another person for:

(1) create a webpage on a commercial social networking site or other website;

or (2) post or send one or more messages on or through a commercial social networking site or other Internet site, other than on or through an electronic messaging program or message board program.

(b) A person commits an offense if they send an email, instant message, text message, or similar communication that references a name, domain address, phone number, or other identifier belonging to any anybody :

(1) without obtaining the consent of the other person;

(2) with the intent to cause the recipient of the communication to reasonably believe that the other person authorized or transmitted the communication;

and (3) with the intent to harm or defraud any person.

Judge Frank J. Fraley was assigned to hear one of the cases and Judge O’Neil Williams the other.

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