U. s. army – Frontier Forts http://www.frontierforts.org/ Wed, 18 May 2022 14:33:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://www.frontierforts.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-09T150409.369-150x150.png U. s. army – Frontier Forts http://www.frontierforts.org/ 32 32 US Army veterans say they saw UFOs on the Israel-Egypt border in 2014 https://www.frontierforts.org/us-army-veterans-say-they-saw-ufos-on-the-israel-egypt-border-in-2014/ Wed, 18 May 2022 12:33:45 +0000 https://www.frontierforts.org/us-army-veterans-say-they-saw-ufos-on-the-israel-egypt-border-in-2014/ Three former US Army troopers said they saw UFOs along the Israel-Egypt border in the Sinai Peninsula in 2014. The veterans told the Daily mail Tuesday that they saw eight glowing objects hovering and hurtling through the sky from a Sinai outpost on the Egyptian border around December 2014. The three cavalry scouts, who were […]]]>

Three former US Army troopers said they saw UFOs along the Israel-Egypt border in the Sinai Peninsula in 2014.

The veterans told the Daily mail Tuesday that they saw eight glowing objects hovering and hurtling through the sky from a Sinai outpost on the Egyptian border around December 2014.

The three cavalry scouts, who were described as trained in aircraft identification, told the UK outlet they believed the objects they saw were not man-made.

“I would describe it as a large object with several smaller objects, which seemed to communicate or fight, like a dogfight in the air,” said one of the three, Sergeant Travis Bingham, 36. Bingham was stationed with E4 Specialist Vishal. Singh and Private First Class Dovell Engram at Observation Post 3-1 in the Sinai, near the southern end of the Israel-Egypt border.

“We knew it wasn’t our army and it was disconcerting,” he added. “The objects were glowing – you could clearly see them with the naked eye, and it was clear how fast they were moving. To date, I have never seen anything like the craft, covering such a distance with extreme speeds.

Their comments were reported the same day the US Congress held its first hearing in half a century on unidentified flying objects. (No, there is still no government confirmation of extraterrestrial life.)

Testifying before a House intelligence subcommittee, Pentagon officials did not release additional information about their ongoing investigation into hundreds of unexplained sightings in the sky.

Ronald Moultrie, undersecretary of defense for intelligence, said the Pentagon is trying to de-stigmatize the issue and encourage pilots and other service members to report anything unusual they see.

Deputy Director of Naval Intelligence Scott Bray, left, and Undersecretary of Defense for Intelligence and Security Ronald Moultrie speak during a hearing of the House Intelligence, Counterterrorism Subcommittee , Counterintelligence and Counterproliferation on Unidentified Aerial Phenomena,’ on Capitol Hill, May 17, 2022, in Washington. (Alex Brandon/AP)

“We want to know what’s out there as much as you want to know what’s out there,” Moultrie told lawmakers, adding that he was a science fiction fan himself.

Observations are usually fleeting. Some only appear in front of the camera for a moment, then sometimes end up being distorted by the camera lens.

A senior Pentagon official briefly demonstrated the challenge on Tuesday. Scott Bray, Deputy Director of Naval Intelligence, stood next to a television to show a short video taken from an F-18 military aircraft. The video shows a blue sky with passing clouds. In one image – it took several minutes for staff in the room to queue – there is an image of a balloon-like shape.

“As you can see, finding the UAP is harder than you think,” Bray said, using the acronym for “unidentified aerial phenomena.”

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DVIDS – News – 11th ACR Ranks Third in US Army Tank Competition https://www.frontierforts.org/dvids-news-11th-acr-ranks-third-in-us-army-tank-competition/ Mon, 16 May 2022 21:09:00 +0000 https://www.frontierforts.org/dvids-news-11th-acr-ranks-third-in-us-army-tank-competition/ Soldiers assigned to Hawg Company, 2nd Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment (ACR) placed third in the 2022 Sullivan Cup competition at Fort Benning, Ga., April 24-May 6. The Sullivan Cup, named for General (Retired) Gordon R. Sullivan, is a biennial competition hosted by the Commandant of the United States Army Armor School. The competition consists […]]]>

Soldiers assigned to Hawg Company, 2nd Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment (ACR) placed third in the 2022 Sullivan Cup competition at Fort Benning, Ga., April 24-May 6. The Sullivan Cup, named for General (Retired) Gordon R. Sullivan, is a biennial competition hosted by the Commandant of the United States Army Armor School.

The competition consists of physically and mentally challenging events while evaluating rig operation, sustainment and lethality of competing crews. This year’s event brought together participants using the M2A3 Bradley fighting vehicle for the first time in the competition’s history, as well as M1A2 Abrams main battle tank crews from across the U.S. military.

The 2022 Sullivan Cup kicked off on April 24 with preliminary tasks such as vehicle issuance, skill tests and shooting tables, to set the conditions for the main competitions from May 2 to May 6. The official opening ceremony began on May 2, prelude to the Bradley and Abrams Crew Shot, a stress shot, physical skill test and culminating with the “Thunder Run” later in the week.

To qualify for the Sullivan Cup, crews assigned to 11th ACR at Fort Irwin were evaluated through four rigorous months of physical training, basic soldier duties, tank maintenance, weapon systems included in tank shooting, small arms qualification, stress shooting. and tank firing tables.

Competing this year as a tank crew of the 11th ACR was Master Sgt. Alex Jobe, tank commander, Sgt. Fernando Medina, gunner, Spc. Arath Flores, loader, and Spc. Driver Joshua Kramer, who all crewed an M1A2 SEPv2 Abrams main battle tank.

Crew firing has begun for Master Sgt. Jobe’s team on May 3 at the Digital Multi-Purpose Range Complex. The multiple firing engagements evaluated all competitor crews in their ability to engage stationary and moving targets laid out in offensive and defensive positions day and night. Following the gunnery iterations, the Sullivan Cup framework held an after action review with crews to discuss US Army crew-based scoring and qualification standards, including the use of modes normal and degraded on the fire control system.

“Tensions were high and the pressure was on,” Spc recalled. Flores after seeing their crew’s ranking in last place at the start of the Table VI shooting. In the previous competition held in 2018, the 11th ACR finished in last place overall. “I made sure I hit all my targets and reloaded when I needed to. I feel like I did this to the best of my ability,” Flores said.

On the morning of 5 May, the 11th ACR team moved to the Simpson and English ranges to be evaluated on their ability to quickly and accurately engage targets with small arms and crew-served weapons. The stress session began with an obstacle course involving running, jumping, jumping barriers, balancing and climbing a rope. After clearing obstacles, competitors engaged downriver targets with the M17 pistol, M4 rifle, and crew-served weapons. Before crossing the finish line, two ranges with simulated losses had to be fired for about 100 meters.

The official rankings were released this afternoon, showing that the 11th ACR had risen from 7th to 6th place.

“It was really good not to be last, but we still had some work to do. The competition wasn’t over,” said Spc. Kramer. “The stress session was much harder than expected. . You had to think about everything you were doing at that time.

After the stress shot, the 11th ACR aircrew moved on to the physical proficiency test at Stewart Field. Competitors were tasked with completing five stations: an ammunition lift, a tow rope, a mix of track blocks, a wheel roll, and a one-mile run.

This part of the competition focused largely on individual physical ability. “We already knew where we were at each individual event. We knew where everyone’s strengths and weaknesses were and we built on that,” Spc said. Flores. Of the five stations, SPC. Kramer thought mixing the track blocks was the most difficult. “It was the intermediate event and the most physically demanding. It was a mental battle and also a physical battle to fight,” Kramer said.

The final event, on May 6, was the “Thunder Run,” a foot race to Brave Rifles Field where competitors then performed a series of physical and tactical tasks such as using a radio, reading maps , call for fire, medical evacuation and weapons. skill.

“I’m proud that the crew was able to keep their spirits up every day through every event or obstacle that was in front of us,” said Spc. Flores.

During the awards ceremony, the 11th ACR Tank Crew was recognized for their excellence by placing first in both the Gunnery Skills Test and the “Thunder Run” events.

“I can’t express how proud I am of my guys,” said the master sergeant. Alex Jobe. “They have worked tirelessly to prove they can compete with the best. They have exceeded expectations and persevered despite all the uncertainties.”

With the end of this year’s competition, the 11th ACR crew attests that the Sullivan Cup this year would not have been a possibility for them without the right planning, training and maintenance team to prepare and support them. sustain.

“While our primary mission here is to provide a world-class opposition force at the National Training Center, with the proper motivation, training and equipment, we can compete with anyone in the military” , said Sgt. 1st Class Travis Daddato, regimental master gunner and trainer for this year’s crew.

The next Sullivan Cup is scheduled to take place the first week of May 2024 in Fort Benning, Georgia.







Date taken: 05.06.2022
Date posted: 16.05.2022 17:09
Story ID: 420839
Location: FORT BENNING, Georgia, USA





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US Army paratroopers land in a North Carolina neighborhood https://www.frontierforts.org/us-army-paratroopers-land-in-a-north-carolina-neighborhood/ Sat, 14 May 2022 09:01:00 +0000 https://www.frontierforts.org/us-army-paratroopers-land-in-a-north-carolina-neighborhood/ Two special forces paratroopers were injured in a North Carolina neighborhood after missing their landing zone on Wednesday. The paratroopers were rescued by People of Hoke County who rushed to their aid after one of the soldiers hit the roof of a nearby house. One of the airborne unit members was hospitalized in critical but […]]]>

Two special forces paratroopers were injured in a North Carolina neighborhood after missing their landing zone on Wednesday.

The paratroopers were rescued by People of Hoke County who rushed to their aid after one of the soldiers hit the roof of a nearby house.

One of the airborne unit members was hospitalized in critical but stable condition, said Army Maj. Rick Dickinson, a Fort Bragg spokesman. army time.

The other soldier was treated for minor injuries at the scene. Training was temporarily suspended that day.

Both soldiers are members of the 3rd Special Forces Group (Airborne).

Military leaders said WRAL the paratroopers were using Boeing CH-47 Chinook helicopters for jump practice over the St Mere-Eglise drop zone, about 8 miles from where they crashed.

Two Special Forces paratroopers missed their target and landed in a suburban North Carolina neighborhood.
CBS-17

The US Army Special Operations Command did not immediately respond to the Post’s request for comment.

the 3rd Special Forces Group (Airborne) has a long history of service in times of peace and war. Stationed at Fort Bragg, it is the main special forces group on operations in Central Asia.

Special forces units perform seven key missions, including unconventional warfare, foreign homeland defense, special reconnaissance, direct action, counterterrorism, counterproliferation, and information operations.

North Carolina Paratroopers
One of the paratroopers was hospitalized and is in stable condition.
CBS-17

The incident comes after a US soldier was tragically killed by a bear in Alaska this week.

Army Staff Sgt. Seth Michael Plant, 30, was identified Thursday as the soldier who died from injuries sustained in a bear attack Tuesday at a remote training area at Joint Base Elemendorf-Richardson.

Plant, an infantryman with the 3rd Battalion, 509th Parachute Infantry Regiment, who had deployed to Afghanistan, was later pronounced dead at the military base hospital.

North Carolina Paratroopers
The paratroopers were members of the 3rd Special Forces Group (Airborne).
CBS-17

Last month, a 21-year-old paratrooper from New York State died while jumping from a helicopter during a training exercise.

SPC. Abigail Jenks of Gansevoort was performing a static line jump from a UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter at Fort Bragg in North Carolina on Monday when she was fatally injured, military officials said.

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Here’s what US Army leaders are learning from the Russian-Ukrainian war https://www.frontierforts.org/heres-what-us-army-leaders-are-learning-from-the-russian-ukrainian-war/ Thu, 12 May 2022 20:51:35 +0000 https://www.frontierforts.org/heres-what-us-army-leaders-are-learning-from-the-russian-ukrainian-war/ Senior military officials told House lawmakers on Thursday that Russia’s invasion of Ukraine vindicated many of their priorities for technological modernization. “Long-range precision fire is extremely important,” Army Chief of Staff General James McConville said, indirectly referring to Ukraine’s ability to translate field intelligence. battle in high-impact strikes on key Russian leaders and equipment. “We […]]]>

Senior military officials told House lawmakers on Thursday that Russia’s invasion of Ukraine vindicated many of their priorities for technological modernization.

“Long-range precision fire is extremely important,” Army Chief of Staff General James McConville said, indirectly referring to Ukraine’s ability to translate field intelligence. battle in high-impact strikes on key Russian leaders and equipment. “We see the value in that…the ability to sink ships, the ability to hit command posts.”

Ukrainian forces have killed at least 12 Russian generals since the start of the war, and the New York Times reported that US officials provided real-time intelligence on their whereabouts in Ukraine. The Pentagon denied this information.

McConville also pointed to drones – both military and modified commercial off the shelf units – and “anti-drone capability” as key assets whose importance was demonstrated during the war. Numerous videos have emerged from both sides of the conflict that also show drones coordinating the fires.

“It’s really about speed, range and convergence — bringing all of these systems together,” McConville said. “Doing combined arms as a joint force coming together would give you the capabilities you need to be very, very effective [like] what is happening in Ukraine.

Armed Forces Secretary Christine Wormuth added that the service is “investing” in counter-drone technology.

The two leaders also stressed the importance of joint training exercises that provide partner nations with experience in large-scale maneuvers.

“About 75% of [Ukraine’s] the brigades participated in large-scale US-led training exercises, McConville said. “The more we can do to build the capabilities and capabilities of our allies and partners – or just friends – really matters.”

Beyond technology and strategy, the Chief of Staff noted important tactical lessons, such as Russia’s apparent failure to effectively integrate armor and infantry at the tactical level, which made their vehicles vulnerable to man-portable anti-tank systems like the Javelin and NLAW.

“We have the best tanks and armored personnel carriers…but to me it’s also how you employ them,” McConville said. He added that the army is also working on implementing active protection systems on its vehicles.

“I think we are in a much better position [than Russia]“, said McConville.

Davis Winkie is a staff reporter covering the military. He originally joined Military Times as a reporting intern in 2020. Prior to journalism, Davis worked as a military historian. He is also a human resources officer in the Army National Guard.

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Indo-Pacific Ground Forces meet in Waikiki | Article https://www.frontierforts.org/indo-pacific-ground-forces-meet-in-waikiki-article/ Wed, 11 May 2022 05:08:49 +0000 https://www.frontierforts.org/indo-pacific-ground-forces-meet-in-waikiki-article/ FORT SHAFTER, Hawaii– The Land Forces Pacific Symposium (LANPAC), May 17-19 at the Sheraton Waikiki, is a professional development forum sponsored by the Association of the United States Army (AUSA). Through a roundtable format, U.S. Army leaders alongside regional and joint partners discuss and present the critical role of land forces Pacific. The LANPAC 2022 […]]]>

FORT SHAFTER, Hawaii– The Land Forces Pacific Symposium (LANPAC), May 17-19 at the Sheraton Waikiki, is a professional development forum sponsored by the Association of the United States Army (AUSA).

Through a roundtable format, U.S. Army leaders alongside regional and joint partners discuss and present the critical role of land forces Pacific.

The LANPAC 2022 theme is, “Strengthening Alliances and Partnerships: How Land Power Contributes to a Free and Open Indo-Pacific.” This multilateral event brings together leaders from the land force, industry, academia, various agencies and our overseas partners in the Indo-Pacific region, to promote professional development, enhance relationships military, to share best practices, and to advance interagency, joint, intergovernmental, and multinational in land operations in the United States Indo-Pacific Command (USINDOPACOM) area of ​​operations.

The professional dialogue and exchange of ideas over three days creates beneficial discourse and understanding across the vast region of mutual interests, challenges and concerns. Panel discussions and scheduled forums broaden the level of engagement and exchange, broaden collaboration, and cultivate the spirit of innovation.

A full list of planned discussion material, participants and schedule can be found on the conference website using the following link: https://meetings.ausa.org/lanpac/2022/index.cfm

All times listed are Hawaii Standard Time. Please note that panel membership may change without notice.

If you cannot physically attend, the roundtables will be streamed inhabit via the Defense Video & Imagery Distribution System (DVIDS) using the following link:

https://www.dvidshub.net/feature/LANPAC22

Discussion forums and keynotes will be recorded and archived on the LANPAC DVIDS feature page.

(No implied endorsement)

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DVIDS – News – 3rd Infantry Division Wins US Army’s Top Bradley Crew at Sullivan Cup https://www.frontierforts.org/dvids-news-3rd-infantry-division-wins-us-armys-top-bradley-crew-at-sullivan-cup/ Mon, 09 May 2022 14:12:00 +0000 https://www.frontierforts.org/dvids-news-3rd-infantry-division-wins-us-armys-top-bradley-crew-at-sullivan-cup/ FORT BENNING, Ga. – An M2A3 Bradley fighting vehicle crew and an M1A2 SEPv2 Abrams tank crew assigned to the “Spartan Brigade,” 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, from Fort Stewart, Wash. Georgia, competed in the 2022 Sullivan Cup against six other tank teams and four other Bradley teams May 2-6 at Fort […]]]>

FORT BENNING, Ga. – An M2A3 Bradley fighting vehicle crew and an M1A2 SEPv2 Abrams tank crew assigned to the “Spartan Brigade,” 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, from Fort Stewart, Wash. Georgia, competed in the 2022 Sullivan Cup against six other tank teams and four other Bradley teams May 2-6 at Fort Benning. The Bradley Crew took first place, bringing the Sullivan Cup back to the Marne Division after also winning the competition the last time it was held in 2018 due to the pandemic.

“We think winning is important and we believe in competition; competition breeds skill,” said Gen. Paul E. Funk II, the 17th commanding general of the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, during the Sullivan Cup.

The competition embodies its namesake, retired General Gordon R. Sullivan, who commanded numerous armored formations throughout his 36 years of service. The biennial Sullivan Cup brings together tank and Bradley crews from across the Army and the world, then rigorously and comprehensively tests their individual and crew-level skills.

“It shows what it takes to be an armor crewman in our military,” said Capt. Matthew Meyer, an operations officer assigned to the 30th Adjutant General’s Battalion, 194th Armor Brigade, U.S. Armor School. , and the officer in charge of the Starry Physical Competency Test. “Overall, it brings out the best in every crew and every competitor.”

Tank crews and, for the first time, Bradley crews, from Army armored divisions participated in the competition. The tank and Bradley crews completed the same events but competed separately.

The “Spartan Brigade”, 2nd ABCT, 3rd ID, fielded two teams to represent the department of Marne. Bradley’s crew included Staff Sgt. Julian Gaitor, SPC. Tyler McGinnis and PFC. Patrick Sullivan assigned to “Hound Battalion”, 3rd Battalion, 67th Armored Regiment, 2nd ABCT, 3rd ID, and the tank crew included Staff Sgt. Steven Shives, Staff Sgt. Colby Kuberski, sergeant. Grant Arnall and SPC. Alejandro Anguiano assigned to the “Panther Battalion”, 2nd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment, 2nd ABCT, 3rd ID.

Prior to the main events, competitors took part in a week of preliminary rounds, which allowed them to familiarize themselves with the vehicles they would use for competition and earn points towards their overall score.

The Sullivan Cup began after Operation Thunderstrike, a public live-fire demonstration of Army history and the evolution of armored warfare and an opening ceremony that introduced the competitors. The next two days tested the gunnery skills of the crews with their respective armored vehicle with day and night live fire.

Sullivan, the Bradley crew pilot, assigned to 3rd Bn., 67th AR, 2nd ABCT, 3rd ID, said the hardest thing about the Sullivan Cup was mentally pushing yourself to do your best and not to make mistakes at each event.

The stress shoot and Starry Physical Proficiency Test assessed crew fitness and team cohesion with back-to-back challenges in hot and humid weather.

The final challenge was Operation Thunder Run. Competitors traveled two and a half miles to Brave Rifles Field to complete several tasks, such as assembling a single-channel ground and airborne radio system and reacting to indirect fire.

After the five days of challenges, the Spartan Bradley Crew came in first place, making them the first Bradley Crew in the Army to win a Sullivan Cup.

“Our Bradley and Abrams crews have fought hard for the past two weeks, showing courage and endurance,” said Command Sgt. Maj. Jaime Lopez, the Senior Advisor enlisted for 2nd ABCT, 3rd ID. “We are very proud of both teams and thrilled for our Bradley Crew winning the title of Best Bradley Crew in the Army.”

The winning crews received a trophy and various gifts and Brig. General Thomas M. Feltey, commandant of the School of Armor, the U.S. Army Maneuver Center of Excellence, knighted them in the Order of St. George, recognizing their excellence in the branches of the US Army armor and cavalry.

“The Sullivan Cup is a rigorous test of technical skill and physical will,” said Col. Terry R. Tillis, commander of 2nd ABCT, 3rd ID. “We are immensely proud of our Bradley Crew who exemplify a cohesive, expertly trained team who are true masters of their craft.”

The Sullivan Cup showcased the skill of the tank crews and Bradleys who made their debut at Fort Benning.

“The cohesion of our crew and the bond that we have had from the very beginning has always been strong, but I would definitely say this competition has brought us a lot closer together,” said Gaitor, the Bradley crew commander from 3rd Bn., 67th AR, 2nd ABCT, 3rd ID.

3rd Bn., 67th AR, 2nd ABCT, 3rd ID is the same battalion that won the Sullivan Cup the last time it was held in 2018.







Date taken: 05.09.2022
Date posted: 05.09.2022 10:12
Story ID: 420228
Location: FORT BENNING, Georgia, USA





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Fort Hood honors graduates at post-large ceremony | Article https://www.frontierforts.org/fort-hood-honors-graduates-at-post-large-ceremony-article/ Thu, 05 May 2022 20:24:18 +0000 https://www.frontierforts.org/fort-hood-honors-graduates-at-post-large-ceremony-article/ Graduates throw their caps in the air in celebration of achieving their education goals during a Howze Auditorium-wide graduation ceremony at Fort Hood, Texas, April 26. In all, 32 graduates from 13 colleges were honored at three ceremonies on April 25 and 26. (Photo Credit: Brandy Cruz, Fort Hood Public Affairs) SEE THE ORIGINAL FORT […]]]>





Graduates throw their caps in the air in celebration of achieving their education goals during a Howze Auditorium-wide graduation ceremony at Fort Hood, Texas, April 26. In all, 32 graduates from 13 colleges were honored at three ceremonies on April 25 and 26.
(Photo Credit: Brandy Cruz, Fort Hood Public Affairs)

SEE THE ORIGINAL

FORT HOOD, TX- Thirty-two graduates from 13 colleges were honored at three post-large graduation ceremonies at Howze Auditorium here on April 25 and 26.

“The graduates here today set a goal and took one step, then another, and another, until they reached their goal of completing their academic program for which we celebrate today” , said Sheri’ Buono, manager of educational services at Fort Hood. Soldier Development Center. “Many have already graduated and received their degrees from their institutions, while others are just a few classes away from completing that final paper, that final grade, that last sigh of relief.”

Col. Chad R. Foster, Commander, U.S. Army Garrison – Fort Hood, applauded the graduates for the countless weeks, months, and even years it took to complete this process, despite the long hours and sleepless nights. He said they are a positive example for others to emulate as they wonder if they have what it takes to graduate.

The colonel told the graduates that they now have an obligation to go out and use their new knowledge, gained through their degrees, to better their families, their organizations and themselves.

Sharing a quote from German philosopher Immanuel Kant, Foster said, “’Experience without theory is blind, but theory without experience is mere intellectual play.’ What Kant was describing was the necessary balance that must exist between what you learn from books and what you learn from life.

One graduate from each of the three graduation ceremonies was selected to be the student lecturer for their class. The three student-lecturers shared their personal journey in higher education.

Staff Sgt. Hanna Weilbacher, who earned a Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice, thanked her family and friends, especially her mother, for supporting and encouraging her and never doubting her abilities.

She challenged the graduates to think of other goals they want to achieve.

“If this is the end of your studies, find a new challenge and keep fighting for your goals,” she said.

Tanya Balderrama shared her high school story with perfect grades and having no idea what she wanted to be when she “grows up”. So she decided to enlist in the army.

Today, she lists a slew of degrees, including an associate in medical assisting, a bachelor’s degree in psychology, a master’s in counseling, and an executive certificate in higher education administration, leading to her pursuit of a doctorate in higher education. and management.

“It is possible to achieve your goals at military expense, because I am a living testimony to that,” she said.

Retired Sergeant. 1st Class Joel Carter shared his journey as an immigrant from Liberia, West Africa who joined the military at the age of 34. He has since earned a bachelor’s and master’s degree in theology, a bachelor’s degree in emergency management and disaster operations, and now a master of arts in emergency and disaster management.

“I volunteered to share my story only to inspire and prove that hard work and determination will pay off,” Carter said. “The journey has been difficult, therefore only you can tell the journey or the story.”

Of the 32 graduates, one received an executive certificate, two received associate’s degrees, 12 received their bachelor’s degrees, and 17 received their master’s degrees. After crossing the stage and receiving a certificate on behalf of the Fort Hood Soldier Development Center, the graduates were asked to stand and face the audience.

A thunderous applause rang out as the graduates moved their tassels from the right to the left of their caps, signaling the end of the graduation ceremony and the start of their next journey.

“Never doubt yourself for what you have accomplished,” Foster said, “and above all, never doubt yourself for what you are going to accomplish.”

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The Supreme Court Marshal’s leak probe is new but not rookie https://www.frontierforts.org/the-supreme-court-marshals-leak-probe-is-new-but-not-rookie/ Tue, 03 May 2022 23:32:53 +0000 https://www.frontierforts.org/the-supreme-court-marshals-leak-probe-is-new-but-not-rookie/ The Marshal of the United States Supreme Court is probably best known for announcing the entrance of the justices at the start of each session with the words “Oyez, Oyez, Oyez”. But now the recently appointed Field Marshal, Colonel Gail A. Curleyhas a more demanding task, investigating the leak of a draft opinion from Justice […]]]>

The Marshal of the United States Supreme Court is probably best known for announcing the entrance of the justices at the start of each session with the words “Oyez, Oyez, Oyez”.

But now the recently appointed Field Marshal, Colonel Gail A. Curleyhas a more demanding task, investigating the leak of a draft opinion from Justice Samuel Alito which, if published as written, would overturn abortion rights in the United States, reversing the landmark 1973 Supreme Court decision in Roe v. Wade.

Protesters demonstrate outside the United States Supreme Court in Washington on May 3.

Photographer: Al Drago/Bloomberg

The unauthorized publication of the project has created a social and political maelstrom in the United States, with protests outside the Supreme Court and federal courthouses across the country. Abortion rights supporters in Congress are calling for sweeping changes, such as increasing the number of justices on the court and eliminating the filibuster in the Senate, while abortion rights opponents are demanding prosecution of the person responsible for leaking the document.

Read more: High Court clerks have everything to lose as the leak probe is launched

Chief Judge John Roberts said in a statement on Tuesday that the leak was a “betrayal of the court’s trust” and ordered the Marshal to investigate its source.

That job falls to Curley, a career Army lawyer who took over in June after the retirement of Pamela Talkin, the first female marshal. Curley became the 11th field marshal in court history.

Curley has a background in security and law, having come to court from the U.S. Army where she was head of the National Security Law Division in the Judge Advocate General’s office.

She oversaw a team of judge advocates and provided legal advice and support on national security law to senior military leaders, according to her Supreme Court profile.

From 2016 to 2019, Curley served as staff judge advocate at U.S. Army Europe Headquarters in Wiesbaden, Germany, where she served as senior U.S. Army counsel for an area comprised of 50 nations and oversaw more than 300 legal professionals. She has also worked in Afghanistan.

At the Supreme Court, Curley manages approximately 260 employees, including the Supreme Court Police, who provide security for the judges, court staff, visitors, the building and surrounding grounds.

While providing security, the Marshal and Supreme Court Police have the authority to make arrests for violations of state or federal law and any regulations. A decision on a prosecution would likely come from the Department of Justice.

Read more: Cover-up believed to be a crime in probe into leaked Supreme Court decision

This is what the Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell says he wants to see.

“This unlawful action should be investigated and punished as fully as possible,” McConnell said in a statement. “The Department of Justice should pursue criminal charges, if appropriate.”

A dozen Republicans urged the attorney general Merrick Garland in a letter to immediately begin an investigation and demanded a briefing from the department by May 10 on the status of the investigation.

The Justice Department did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Curley earned his bachelor’s degree in political science in 1991 from the United States Military Academy and earned a JD in 1999 from the University of Illinois College of Law, according to his Supreme Court profile. She received a Master of Laws in 2004 from the Judge Advocate General’s Legal Center and School and a Master of Science in 2014 from the Dwight D. Eisenhower School for National Security and Resource Strategy.

In addition to his security duties, the Marshal also pays the salaries of the Chief Justice and Associate Justices.

–With the help of Chris Strohm.

To contact the reporter on this story:
Joe Schneider in Los Angeles at jschneider5@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story:
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Army’s new travel claim system affects soldiers in Japan but not South Korea https://www.frontierforts.org/armys-new-travel-claim-system-affects-soldiers-in-japan-but-not-south-korea/ Mon, 02 May 2022 06:55:00 +0000 https://www.frontierforts.org/armys-new-travel-claim-system-affects-soldiers-in-japan-but-not-south-korea/ Soldiers being processed fill out their travel vouchers during a financial briefing at Fort Carson, Colorado on August 21, 2020. (James Geelen/US Army) US soldiers traveling to Japan submit their travel documents to the military electronically upon arrival, much like their peers will in Germany, Italy and Belgium, according to a US military spokesperson in […]]]>

Soldiers being processed fill out their travel vouchers during a financial briefing at Fort Carson, Colorado on August 21, 2020. (James Geelen/US Army)

US soldiers traveling to Japan submit their travel documents to the military electronically upon arrival, much like their peers will in Germany, Italy and Belgium, according to a US military spokesperson in Japan.

Soldiers assigned to permanent change of station, or PCS, in Japan launched the new system in January, U.S. Army spokesman Manuel Torres-Cortes told Stars and Stripes by email on Friday. They are expected to complete their travel voucher themselves via the Defense Finance and Accounting Service’s online system, SmartVoucher.

Troops assigned to South Korea will continue to fill out travel vouchers through their financial services after their arrival, Eighth Army public affairs officer Neil Penttila told the Stars and Stripes by phone Friday.

The shift to the online system is part of the military’s effort to have more administrative tasks done virtually when possible.

Soldiers moving to Germany, Italy and Belgium will need to use the new online system from June 1 upon arrival or risk not being reimbursed for some of their moving costs.

“It’s kind of like a TurboTax system, where it asks questions, and then the answers to those questions are what build the right PCS,” Kimberly Jordan, director of the 266th Finance Support Center in Kaiserslautern, Germany, told Stars and Stripes Thursday. .

Once completed, the voucher is sent to the soldier’s finance office for final review before being submitted to DFAS, Jordan said.

Soldiers are advised to fill out the voucher on the day they arrive in Japan to ensure that they are paid correctly and that their salary is not frozen.

Soldiers with a myPay account automatically have access to SmartVoucher, so no registration is required. Even after filing the application online, soldiers should still contact their unit’s finance office upon arrival.

Only soldiers are required to submit the request to SmartVoucher under the new policy; other military branches have their own rules.

Stars and Stripes reporter David Choi contributed to this report.

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Charles Young: A century after his death, the first black colonel in the US Army is promoted to general https://www.frontierforts.org/charles-young-a-century-after-his-death-the-first-black-colonel-in-the-us-army-is-promoted-to-general/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 10:42:00 +0000 https://www.frontierforts.org/charles-young-a-century-after-his-death-the-first-black-colonel-in-the-us-army-is-promoted-to-general/ Young’s promotion retroactively makes him the first recognized Black American with that rank, the military said. The honorary designation, after years of efforts to promote him posthumously, was the subject of a formal promotion ceremony at the United States Military Academy at West Point on Friday. After Young was passed over for a promotion before […]]]>

Young’s promotion retroactively makes him the first recognized Black American with that rank, the military said.

The honorary designation, after years of efforts to promote him posthumously, was the subject of a formal promotion ceremony at the United States Military Academy at West Point on Friday.

After Young was passed over for a promotion before his death in 1922, a black service member would not advance to general officer rank in the army until Benjamin Davis Sr. was promoted brigadier general in 1940.

“Young’s promotion today to brigadier general has been long delayed, but fortunately for all of us, it is no longer denied,” Army Undersecretary Gabe Camarillo said Friday at the ceremony. . Camarillo also praised Young as a “model leader” and called his legacy “downright inspiring.”

Members of the de Young family were present at the ceremony, including his great-niece Renotta Young, who received Young’s posthumous honorary promotion order and certificate, a gold-plated leather belt worn by general officers, and a general officer’s flag one star.

“Charles Young resisted social isolation not only at West Point, but throughout his military career and in national parks,” Renotta Young recalled in a speech Friday, adding that despite the difficulties Young faced, he “had managed to like” the American experience.

“Although he felt the acute sting of discriminatory treatment from his classmates here at West Point, at various points in his career from his superiors as well, he did not relegate the whole ‘White America on the racist side of the ledger,’ she added.

Renotta Young told CNN it took half a century for her uncle to be promoted to brigadier general, an effort largely driven by her family and the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc. of which Young is an honorary member.

“Even though it was long overdue, this was the moment it happened, and I think it’s a good time for people to communicate the legacy of his life and what he did. for our country,” she told CNN.

Racism has stalled Young’s career

Born in 1864 in May’s Lick, Kentucky, to slave parents, Young graduated high school with honors and became an elementary school teacher for two years. After his father’s encouragement, Young took the West Point entrance exams but was not selected to attend despite having the second-highest score. It was not until an applicant dropped out the following year that Young received his letter of acceptance and became the academy’s ninth black entrant in 1884. While at the academy, he faced racism from instructors and other cadets, but persevered. In 1889, he became the third black graduate of the academy after Henry Ossian Pinball and John Hanks Alexander.
After graduating from the academy, it took three months before he received an assignment because at the time, black officers were not allowed to command white troops, according to his National Park Service biography. . He was commissioned a second lieutenant and assigned to the Ninth Cavalry in Fort Robinson, Nebraska, and Fort Duchesne, Utah, a regiment of the “Buffalo Soldiers”. the Buffalo Soldiers were regiments of black soldiers who played a key role in American western expansion and were initially commanded by white officers. They were also among the first national park rangers and protected the parks from poachers.

Young would break another barrier in 1903 when he became the first black national park superintendent after he and his troops were assigned to manage Sequoia National Park in northern California. He was the first black military attaché, became the first military attaché to Haiti and the Dominican Republic on the island of Hispaniola in 1904, and was appointed military attaché to Liberia in 1912. He also taught military science and tactics at Wilberforce University in Ohio in between his military duties.

Young received additional promotions during his military career, including major in 1912 and lieutenant colonel in 1916, according to the NPS. He retired from medical treatment in July 1917 and was promoted to colonel, the first black man to reach that rank.

At the time, as he wrote to his longtime friend and civil rights activist WEB DuBois, he was skeptical of the reasoning for medical retirement, as he insisted he was in good health and wanted to continue active duty.
He was later recalled to help train black soldiers in World War I and in 1920 Young was sent back as a military attaché to Liberia. While on a research expedition in Nigeria, Young fell ill and died on January 8, 1922. After his death, his body was repatriated to the United States and buried in Arlington National Cemetery.
Young’s legacy has grown in the century since his death. The Charles Young Buffalo Soldiers National Monument was established in 2013 in Wilberforce, Ohio, and in February 2020 Kentucky Governor Andy Beshear, a Democrat, promoted posthumously Young to Brigadier General in the Kentucky National Guard and sent a letter to President Joe Biden asking him to recognize Young with promotion to the federal level. In November 2021, Undersecretary of Defense Gilbert Cisnero Jr. informed the House and Senate Armed Services Committees that he had approved Young’s honorary promotion.

It was an attempt to remedy a long-standing stain on U.S. military history and honor a man who, as DuBois recalled, was a “triumph of tragedy.”

“No one ever knew the truth about the hell he went through at West Point,” DuBois written in an edition of the NAACP publication “The Crisis” a month after Young’s death.

“He was one of the few men I know who literally turned the other cheek with Jesus Christ,” DuBois wrote. “He was laughed at for it and his own people reprimanded him bitterly, but he persisted. When a Southern white pygmy at West Point protested being taken from a dish past d “First to Young, Young passed it first to him and then to himself. When lower-ranking officers refused to salute a Negro, he would salute them. He rarely loses his temper, rarely complains.”

CNN’s Eva McKend and Veronica Stracqualursi contributed to this report.

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