Soldier barrack – Frontier Forts http://www.frontierforts.org/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 18:46:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://www.frontierforts.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-09T150409.369-150x150.png Soldier barrack – Frontier Forts http://www.frontierforts.org/ 32 32 Disturbing photos show the haunted secret rooms of the Cork City pub as staff speak of a ghost soldier who lives there https://www.frontierforts.org/disturbing-photos-show-the-haunted-secret-rooms-of-the-cork-city-pub-as-staff-speak-of-a-ghost-soldier-who-lives-there/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 11:21:26 +0000 https://www.frontierforts.org/disturbing-photos-show-the-haunted-secret-rooms-of-the-cork-city-pub-as-staff-speak-of-a-ghost-soldier-who-lives-there/ This Leeside pub is one of the oldest in town – but their regulars might not know that the place is actually haunted. Staff have reported sightings of ghosts lurking, usually at night when the doors are locked and the place is closed. The Oval bar opened in 1918 when the Spanish Flu was raging, […]]]>

This Leeside pub is one of the oldest in town – but their regulars might not know that the place is actually haunted. Staff have reported sightings of ghosts lurking, usually at night when the doors are locked and the place is closed.

The Oval bar opened in 1918 when the Spanish Flu was raging, but the building itself has been around for nearly 200 years. It was old apartments – and a family lived above it before it was abandoned in the 1940s.

Manager Oisin explained how the top floor can be unsettling and feel a little weird.

He told CorkBeo: ‘There is no light on the top floor – and we keep our stock on the second floor.

He added that their resident ghost is friendly, which is a relief, and former workers agreed that it can be playful.



The Oval Bar on Tuckey Street

The pub pays an ode to a traditional Irish pub from the early days, with a fireplace and small cubes surrounding the bar. It gives a feeling of wholesome comfort – however, it’s when you’re climbing the stairs that things go awry.

We went up to the first floor, where the toilets are, to the second – which is hidden behind a door. Each time we climbed we could feel the air getting colder and colder – even though the sun was shining and the wind was lacking outside.

Oisin guided us to where they keep their stock – it was not somewhere you would want to be after daylight. We continued and progressed. That’s when we felt a cold breeze but also dead silence.



The reserve on the first floor
The reserve on the first floor

We were shown the old rooms which have not been touched since the family moved. Recently however, they found secret doors that led to small chambers with fireplaces.

There were tattered shoes, pictures and clothes through the hidden door – and the wallpaper looked moldy and burnt. That’s when we ran for the stairs in fear.



The secret bedroom door
The secret bedroom door

It was weird, and former workers shared their experiences with hauntings.

One said: “We were locked in – the door locked – and there were only three of us in the building. One was in the office, the other in the storeroom upstairs, and I was near the landing near the toilets.

“I heard a noise – and I looked down the stairs, but no one was there. The next thing I see is a person running towards a locked door. I opened the door, and he there was no one.”

Another person remembered a story that a friend of his had told him.

“The pub was locked – she was sitting outside waiting for the other person – who was in the office. She then heard someone say hello, three times before someone walked directly past her face. She was really scared and ran all the way upstairs and wouldn’t come down until the other person finished.”

Many said that the one they see regularly is a soldier. He appears in the middle of the bar, in uniform with a gun, walks towards the fireplace – sits on a sofa before disappearing.

It is believed that there is more than one ghost in the building and they want to alert of their presence.

It certainly scared a few of us off, but it doesn’t seem to terrify many regulars or people who would like to visit the pub.

Maybe it’s something you’d like to see for yourself – if the pictures don’t do it justice and you’d like to actually feel the haunting presence in the building. So don’t go in during the day – but wait until night time to maybe see the soldier or the other mysterious things going on there.

Read more:

]]>
An ancient Roman soldier carved a phallus with a personal insult in this stone https://www.frontierforts.org/an-ancient-roman-soldier-carved-a-phallus-with-a-personal-insult-in-this-stone/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 01:16:12 +0000 https://www.frontierforts.org/an-ancient-roman-soldier-carved-a-phallus-with-a-personal-insult-in-this-stone/ Enlarge / Archaeologists have found crude graffiti depicting a penis along with a personal slur in the ancient Roman fort of Vindolanda. Vindolana Charitable Trust Archaeologists excavating the remains of a Roman auxiliary fort in the UK have recently made a startling and rather hilarious discovery: a small stone carved with the unmistakable image of […]]]>
Enlarge / Archaeologists have found crude graffiti depicting a penis along with a personal slur in the ancient Roman fort of Vindolanda.

Vindolana Charitable Trust

Archaeologists excavating the remains of a Roman auxiliary fort in the UK have recently made a startling and rather hilarious discovery: a small stone carved with the unmistakable image of a penis – essentially an ancient Roman d**k photo, accompanied a rude insulting message directed at someone the sculptor obviously didn’t like.

The Vindolanda site is located south of the defensive fortification known as Hadrian’s Wall. An antiquarian named William Camden recorded the existence of the ruins in a 1586 treatise. Over the next 200 years many people visited the site, discovering a military bathhouse in 1702 and an altar in 1715. Reverend Anthony Hedley began excavating the site in 1814, but died before he had a chance to record what he found for posterity. Another altar found in 1914 confirmed that the fort was called Vindolanda.

Serious archaeological excavations at the site began in the 1930s under the direction of Eric Birley, whose sons and grandson have continued the work after his death to the present day. The oxygen-depriving conditions of the deposits (some of which extend six meters or 19 feet into the ground) mean that the artifacts recovered are remarkably well preserved. These include wooden writing tablets and more than 100 boxwood combs, which would have disintegrated long ago in more oxygen-rich conditions.

Tablet from Vindolanda 291, circa 100 CE: An invitation from Claudia Severa to Sulpicia Lepidina, inviting her to a birthday party.
Enlarge / Tablet from Vindolanda 291, circa 100 CE: An invitation from Claudia Severa to Sulpicia Lepidina, inviting her to a birthday party.

The site is best known for the so-called Vindolanda Tablets, among the oldest surviving manuscript records in the UK. Discovered in 1973, they are thin sheets of wood, the size of a postcard, with text written in carbon-based ink. Most of the documents are official military communications and personal messages from soldiers in garrison to their families, revealing many details of life at the fort.

For example, a tablet is a letter from a Roman cavalry officer named Masculus to a prefect requesting that more beer be sent to the garrison. (An army marches on its stomach.) By far the most famous is tablet 291, written around 100 CE by the wife of a commander of a nearby fort named Claudia Severa. It was addressed to Sulpicia Lepidina inviting her to a birthday party and represents one of the earliest known examples of a woman writing in Latin.

Among the many other interesting discoveries: a bronze and silver fibula (a brooch or pin to fasten clothes) in 2006; the remains of a female child between 8 and 10 years old, found in a shallow grave in a barracks in 2010; a wooden toilet seat unearthed in 2014; and two Roman boxing gloves (unmatched) discovered in 2017, similar to modern full-handed boxing gloves, except these date back to 120 CE.

Also in 2017, archaeologists found cavalry barracks littered with swords, ink tablets, textiles and arrowheads, among other artifacts. Archaeologists also found a 5th-century chalice in 2020 and last year unearthed carved sandstone depicting a figure of a naked warrior riding a horse, possibly the Roman deity Mars.

Retired biochemist Dylan Herbert was volunteering at the excavation site when he came across the carved stone.
Enlarge / Retired biochemist Dylan Herbert was volunteering at the excavation site when he came across the carved stone.

Vindolanda Charitable Trust

Regarding this latest discovery, one of the volunteers working on the excavation was a retired biochemist from South Wales named Dylan Herbert, who initially thought of the stone as just a piece of rubble. But when he turned it over, he noticed clear letters and realized that it was far from ordinary. “It wasn’t until I cleared the mud that I realized the full extent of what I had discovered, and I was absolutely thrilled,” Herbert said.

The stone is quite small, measuring 40 cm wide by 15 cm high (15 inches by 6 inches). Experts in Roman epigraphy have recognized the lettering as a mutilated version of Cacator Secundinuswhich translates to (ahem) “Secundinus, the shit”. The image of the penis only added insult to injury – a clever subversion of the traditional interpretation of a phallus as a positive symbol of fertility. The Vindolanda site now has 13 phallic carvings, more than those discovered at any other excavation site along Hadrian’s Wall.

“The recovery of an inscription, a direct message from the past, is always a big event on a Roman dig, but this one really raised our eyebrows when we deciphered the message on the stone,” said Andrew Birley, director digs and CEO. of the Vindolanda Trust. “Its author clearly had a big problem with Secundinus and was confident enough to publicly announce his thoughts on a stone. I have no doubt Secundinus would have been less than amused to see this when he wandered around the site more 1700 years old.”

]]>
Local DAR chapter honors American Revolution veteran, former slave – Eagle News Online https://www.frontierforts.org/local-dar-chapter-honors-american-revolution-veteran-former-slave-eagle-news-online/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 15:09:38 +0000 https://www.frontierforts.org/local-dar-chapter-honors-american-revolution-veteran-former-slave-eagle-news-online/ NELSON — On June 8, the Fayetteville-Owahgena Chapter of the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) honored Plymouth Freeman, a former slave and Revolutionary War veteran who lived in the town of Nelson . To commemorate his life and patriotism, the organization dedicated a New York State Historical Marker at 4035 […]]]>

NELSON — On June 8, the Fayetteville-Owahgena Chapter of the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) honored Plymouth Freeman, a former slave and Revolutionary War veteran who lived in the town of Nelson .

To commemorate his life and patriotism, the organization dedicated a New York State Historical Marker at 4035 Putnam Road, Nelson.

Obtained through a grant from the Syracuse-based William G. Pomeroy Foundation, the road marker reads:

PLYMOUTH FREEMAN
BLACK PATRIOT AWARD BADGE
MERIT FOR 6 YEARS OF SERVICE
WITH THE THIRD CT REGIMENT AT
REVOLUTIONARY WAR. LIVED
NEAR HERE CA. 1800 TO 1829.

The dedication ceremony included the Cazenovia American Legion Post 88 Color Guard, welcome remarks from Regent Chapter Donna Wassall, an invocation from Chaplain Elizabeth Thoreck, the Pledge of Allegiance from Karen Christensen, the National Anthem from Susan Taylor , comments by Denise Doring VanBuren, the 45th General President of the National DAR Society, an overview of Freeman’s life by former Chapter Regent Bonnie Ranieri, and a Pomeroy Foundation statement read by Madison County Historian Matthew Urtz.

Also in attendance were NYS Vice Regent and Regent-elect Pamela Barrack and owners, Josh and Colleen Fox.

The research into Freeman’s life was inspired by Christensen, led by Wassall, and assisted by Urtz and the City of Nelson’s co-historian, Laine Gilmore.

Legend has it that Freeman was born the son of a king in Guinea, Africa, and was kidnapped by slave traders as a child and brought to America. He was also said to be a cook/waiter for General George Washington, who gave him his freedom and his name.

Although much of Freeman’s story is difficult to prove, DAR research has led to the following conclusions about his life:

Freeman enlisted in the Continental Army as “Plymouth Negro” on May 26, 1777, at Windsor, Connecticut, and was assigned to a Connecticut regiment.

Much of his time in the service was spent serving as the general’s server.

“Plymouth would have had to go everywhere with the general and be at his service at all times,” Ranieri said. “By George Washington’s orders, all waiters or servants were to be drilled and ready to take up arms at any time.”

Muster lists dated 1777–1782 show Plymouth Negro in service with General Jedediah Huntington at many notable events and battles.

For example, his assignment as a waiter in Huntington would have taken him to Valley Forge during the winter encampment of 1777-1778 and to the Battle of Monmouth Court House in June 1778. He would also likely have accompanied the general on court assignment. martial. of General Charles Lee, and the trial and execution of British Major John André.

As of January 1783, Plymouth Negro is no longer documented in muster lists or military records. Instead, a soldier named Plymouth Freeman begins to appear – no longer a minion, now a soldier.

Freeman was discharged on June 8, 1783. Signed by Washington, his discharge papers credit him with six years of loyal service for which he was awarded the Military Merit Badge. Eventually, he also received a 100-acre land bounty and a Revolutionary War government pension for his contribution to the struggle for independence.

In the 1800s, Freeman found his way to Cazenovia. He lived in Cazenovia and Nelson in what was then the Jackson’s Corners neighborhood. He worked as a farmer, traded goods, raised his son, Jeremiah, and made his living in Madison County until his death in 1829.

According to the DAR, the exact site of Freeman’s residence in Nelson is unknown, but it was likely right next to the location of the highway marker.

“The truth about Plymouth’s time in the Continental Army is even more interesting [than the legend]”, Ranieri said. “His role, like that of thousands of others, was essential in securing our freedom. We can be certain that Plymouth knew the deep and innate desire for freedom, more than any of us can. ‘imagine. He sought freedom and sacrificed himself for freedom. He served faithfully and honorably, earning the respect, admiration and appreciation of his commanders. That is a fact, and for that, we will be eternally grateful to Plymouth Freeman.

During his remarks, VanBuren highlighted DAR’s nationwide “E Pluribus Unum Educational Initiative,” a five-year effort launched in 2020 to increase awareness of often underrepresented Revolutionary War patriots, including those who were African American, Native American, and women.

“Just as today we are merging as a nation, so was the Continental Army and indeed the whole movement to win America’s independence,” she said. . “Too often the stories of patriots of color, patriot women, foreign-born patriots, Native American patriots have been left out of the mainstream history books. [The initiative] includes funding for a doctoral student at our headquarters who helps us identify more patriots of color [and] help us find better ways to tell the stories of these men and women with the goal, hopefully, as we approach America’s 250th birthday, to find a way to illustrate that there is more to unites us than separates and divides us.

Jason Emerson, an independent historian from Cazenovia, has also researched Freeman’s life and military service.

In a February 24, 2019, article for the New York Almanack website, titled “Plymouth Freeman: American Revolution Veteran, Former Slave,” Emerson provides insight into Freeman’s life and military service.

The full article can be viewed online at newyorkalmanack.com.

The William G. Pomeroy Foundation is committed to supporting the celebration and preservation of community history and working to improve the likelihood of finding matched donors or other lifesaving treatments for blood cancer patients.

The foundation’s New York State Historic Road Marker Grant Program commemorates historical people, places, things, or events in the period 1740-1922.

Since 2006, when Bill Pomeroy created the foundation’s first marker program, the organization has awarded nearly 1,800 grants for highway markers and plaques nationwide.

For more information about the Pomeroy Foundation, visit wgpfoundation.org.

Founded in 1890, the DAR is a nonprofit, nonpolitical voluntary women’s service organization dedicated to promoting patriotism, preserving American history, and securing America’s future through a better education of children.

The Fayetteville chapter of the DAR National Society was organized by Clara Folsom on February 4, 1921. The Owahgena chapter of Cazenovia was organized by Amanda Dows on March 5, 1896. The merger of the two chapters was approved by the board of directors of New York State on October 15. , 1994.

To learn more about the DAR, visit dar.org.

]]>
How targeted police killings reflect the changing nature of activism. https://www.frontierforts.org/how-targeted-police-killings-reflect-the-changing-nature-of-activism/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 01:00:00 +0000 https://www.frontierforts.org/how-targeted-police-killings-reflect-the-changing-nature-of-activism/ On the evening of March 26, two militants broke into the home of Ghulam Mohammad Dar in Budgam district, central Kashmir. The two-storey house sits on the edge of a railway line in the Chatta Bugh area of ​​Budgam. It is isolated from the rest of the village, which means that the Dars have no […]]]>

On the evening of March 26, two militants broke into the home of Ghulam Mohammad Dar in Budgam district, central Kashmir. The two-storey house sits on the edge of a railway line in the Chatta Bugh area of ​​Budgam. It is isolated from the rest of the village, which means that the Dars have no neighbors.

Two of Ghulam Muhammad Dar’s sons, Ishfaq Ahmad, 25, a special police constable, and Umar Jan, 22, a student who also owned a print shop, were at home at the time.

“It was time for evening prayers,” recalled a family member who did not want to be named. “I heard a noise in the hallway. When I came out of the room I was sitting in, I saw two men heckle Ishfaq and Umar. Then suddenly a man pulled out a gun and shot Ishfaq several times in the head.

After the gunshots, other family members tried to flee the house. Umar Jan did not survive. “They shot him as close to the main gate, at least four to five times,” the relative said. While Ishfaq Ahmed was pronounced dead in hospital, Umar Jan later died from his injuries.

According to the relative, when the militants entered their house, the two brothers were busy with work. “Ishfaq was preparing for the police sub-inspector’s exam scheduled for the next day. Umar was working on a print file on his laptop,” he recalls. “When we went to their room afterwards, their laptops were still open.”

As a special police officer, not yet regularized in the force, Ahmad entered service for only a few days a month, working as a gardener on police property. “He thought no one would hurt him since he was just a gardener in the police,” the relative explained.

Ghulam Muhammad Dar has two other sons. Both work for Jammu and Kashmir Police. They were not at home when the armed men burst in.

Ishfaq Ahmed is among eight police officers killed by militants in Kashmir this year. In five cases, police officers were targeted by militants armed with pistols while off duty. In at least two of these five targeted killings, militants also injured or killed relatives of police officers.

Police say the killings reflect the changing nature of militancy in Kashmir.

The funeral of the Budgam brothers. Photo: Faisal Bashir

Become a target

Police killings in Kashmir are not new. For decades, militants have launched guerrilla-style attacks on security forces, firing on patrols, throwing grenades at convoys and opening fire as they snatch rifles from on-duty personnel.

Police and other security personnel have also been known to be targeted when off duty. But overall, targeted killings have accelerated this year. Kashmir has seen at least 19 targeted killings this year, with victims including minorities and migrant workers in the valley.

As militant groups expand their list of targets, families of police officers have also become vulnerable to attack. While Ishfaq Ahmad’s brother was killed, an attack in Srinagar on May 26 killed policeman Saifullah Qadri and injured his nine-year-old daughter.

“Most of these killings were carried out by newly recruited terrorists armed with pistols or surface workers who are not trained in the handling of weapons,” said a senior Kashmir police official, who did not wish to be named. In traditional police parlance, surface workers are non-combatants tasked with helping militant groups with logistics. However, as the official suggested, they may also have been drawn into active attacks.

According to the official, the attacks were also aimed at demoralizing the police force. “Apart from the murder of a policeman, we also know that these murders are aimed at terrorizing their families. It affects the psyche of a policeman. We also read it as terrorists becoming emboldened.

Also, the official suggested, the militants may have chosen targeted assassinations because they had failed to carry out larger attacks. “The militants’ ability to attack a convoy or carry out a large attack has diminished due to rapid counter-militant operations in recent years,” he said. “That’s why they choose soft targets like off-duty police officers, members of minorities and unprotected panchayat representatives.”

In recent years, the police have come under increasing criticism, accounting for a growing proportion of victims of security forces. According to official data, in 2019, 11 police officers were killed, or 13% of the 83 victims of the security forces. This figure rose to 26% in 2020 – 16 of the 60 members of the security forces killed were police officers. Last year, half of the 42 security personnel killed in militancy-related incidents were police.

Police personnel can be the most vulnerable of the security forces. “About 60% of the police force belong to the same company as the activists,” said another police officer who also spoke on condition of anonymity. “A police officer is not a soldier who lives in a barracks or cantonment. He has a family, a house and relatives in the same society. That’s why he’s more vulnerable.

Srinagar shootings

As a new wave of grassroots activism swept across Kashmir over the past decade, police officers in rural areas, particularly in South Kashmir, avoided returning home for fear of being attacked while off duty. Now, police officers in Srinagar are also being targeted. Of the eight police officers killed this year, three died in Srinagar. Two of them were targeted assassinations.

On the morning of May 7, Ghulam Hassan Dar left on his motorbike for the police control room in Srinagar, where he was working as a driver for the Jammu and Kashmir Police Emergency Services. The 43-year-old constable was about two kilometers from his home when he was shot dead by militants. He was rushed to hospital, where he died that evening.

Ghulam Hassan Dar’s wife cannot imagine who would target her husband. She recalled how he went out of his way to help people, how he made sure all his neighbors had festive food for Eid.

Everyone in his neighborhood knew he worked for the police, but he seemed to be living an ordinary civilian life. “He was someone who left every morning with his lunch box and came back in the evening,” recalls Ghulam Muhammad Dar, his brother. “I never saw him in uniform or brandishing a gun.”

For Ghulam Hassan Dar, policing was just another job. Before becoming a special policeman, he worked as a day laborer to support his family. “His services were regularized in 2013,” said his nephew, Sameer Ahmad Dar, also a special police officer.

Other officers feared they would become targets because of their work, but Ghulam Hassan Dar didn’t seem worried. “He was just a driver. He had nothing to do with stone throwing or activism,” his brother said.

Ghulam Hassan Dar never worried about being targeted. Photo: Safwat Zargar

“He knew the dangers of his job”

Qadri, on the other hand, knew the dangers of his job. The 38-year-old policeman, who lived in Soura locality in Srinagar, was part of the police’s counter-insurgency unit, called Special Operations Group.

He always carried a gun and avoided going home at a fixed time. There were long absences from home, so his wife, Rabia Qadri, handled all the household chores herself, from buying supplies to making sure the children studied.

But on May 24, Qadri decided to drop off her nine-year-old daughter for school fees. “It was probably the first time in his life that he accompanied his daughter to the tutors,” Rabia Qadri said.

Qadri was shot just 100 meters from his home. Her daughter was also shot in the arm. “I didn’t hear any shots,” said Rabia Qadri. “My injured daughter rushed home to tell me. I thought maybe she had had an accident. I rushed to take her to the hospital. It was in the hospital that I saw my husband lying dead.

She remembers her husband often talking about such a death. “He was very brave – he said he hoped not to be attacked from behind but from in front,” she said. “He was sure he would finish them all on his own. But he was attacked from behind that day. Even though he had a gun on him, he couldn’t do anything.

After completing his studies, Qadri joined the police as a special police officer. In 2014, he became regularized under the police. He had served in troubled areas like Kulgam and Tral in southern Kashmir, Kupwara and Baramulla near the Line of Control in the north. He was also assigned to Kargil for almost 18 months.

“He was passionate about working in the police,” said Mohammad Shafi Qadri, his uncle. “Ever since he was a teenager, he always said that he should be saluted by everyone when he died and that he would receive a guard of honor.”

This prediction has tragically come true.

Saifullah Qadri’s coffin is carried by senior police officials. Photo: Umer Asif

Waiting for assistance

Qadri’s family is now wondering how to make ends meet. His injured daughter is slowly recovering, although her arm is fractured and a nerve damaged, Mohammad Shafi Qadri said.

On May 29, the Lieutenant Governor of Jammu and Kashmir, Manoj Sinha, visited the family. A press release issued later assured “all help and assistance”.

But the family said they had not received much help or compensation from the government. “I only received Rs 1 lakh from the police, which was given to us immediately after his assassination, to perform his funeral and final rites,” Rabia Qadri said.

Ghulam Hassan Dar’s family said they had not received any assistance either apart from Rs 1.70,000 granted by the police. No one else in the family has a stable job. “His son works as an apprentice mason. But since his father was a government employee, it didn’t matter whether he earned Rs 400 or 500 a day,” Sameer Dar explained.

In March of last year, Dar was able to build a two-story house. “He took out a home loan and still owed Rs 15 lakh in the bank,” his wife, Fatima, said. “He had also raised Rs 3 lakh from a relative.”

The government has promised a job to a member of her family, but this is hardly comforting for Fatima. “The authorities told us that only her daughter is eligible for the government post because her son is married and only single parents are eligible for the post,” she said. “We want the job to be given to our son and not the daughter because the family will be left without any permanent source of income after marriage.”

]]>
Taste of Life: When Poona Cantonment Was One of the Most Hygienic Stations in the British Kingdom https://www.frontierforts.org/taste-of-life-when-poona-cantonment-was-one-of-the-most-hygienic-stations-in-the-british-kingdom/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 11:25:13 +0000 https://www.frontierforts.org/taste-of-life-when-poona-cantonment-was-one-of-the-most-hygienic-stations-in-the-british-kingdom/ On a hot summer morning, Sir William James Moore, the Queen’s physician, was in the vicinity of a regimental kitchen at Poona Cantonment. There, he saw, outside, in the open air, a large quantity of rice, which the cooks had put in baskets, in order to evacuate the water. This rice was entirely covered with […]]]>

On a hot summer morning, Sir William James Moore, the Queen’s physician, was in the vicinity of a regimental kitchen at Poona Cantonment. There, he saw, outside, in the open air, a large quantity of rice, which the cooks had put in baskets, in order to evacuate the water. This rice was entirely covered with a black substance, which he noticed, on the basket being lifted, consisting of a myriad of flies. He then entered the kitchen – swarming with flies – and witnessed the way the meat came out of the pots and swayed like it was ‘dog food’.

Moore viewed sanitation as an art. The government asked him to visit various military stations in India and make recommendations to ensure that hygiene was maintained and the troops remained healthy.

Poona in the 1850s was considered the cleanest of the British cantonments in India. It was also one of the greatest. Moore performed most of his experimental work at the station.

He believed that there was almost nothing connected with the diet of European soldiers in India which could be reformed more advantageously than the whole of bakery management as practiced at many Indian stations.

In the 1850s, European nutritionists considered milk and bread to be the two perfect articles of human nutrition, that is, those articles which contained within themselves all the elements necessary for the maintenance of the organism. . They believed that bread had the advantage over biscuits of its spongy structure, presenting a large surface area for the necessary action of saliva.

The sponginess of the bread was obtained by fermentation. The starch in the flour was induced to give off a small proportion of “carbon dioxide”, and this being retained by the tenacity of the surrounding gluten, the dough mass swelled and became spongy. To accomplish this purpose, yeast was used in Europe. In India, toddy, or a mixture of various spices, consisting of saffron, nutmeg, cardamom, cloves and others, was used. A small portion of this mixture was mixed with flour for seven or eight days, and the resulting fermenting mass was used to leaven the bread.

Moore thought that another method of making bread could be introduced to India. The fact that fermentation was not necessary to produce starch and gluten for human consumption was evidenced by the many categories of people who prepared their “roti”, rejecting the process entirely.

Dr. Dauglish had then patented his process of manufacturing “aerated bread”, by which the dough distended under the effect of the mechanical pressure of the air, and was not affected by any chemical process, and not polluted even by the touch of a hand, the machine transforming into an oven a rapid succession of ready-to-use breads. This bread was just as light and spongy as fermented breads; it kept better, the “workers” ate more of it, and less meat when they used fermented bread; and at Guy’s Hospital in London, where it was tried on an experimental basis, none were left behind by patients, who used to reject much of the bread once supplied.

Baking, then, in any country was, to say the least, a most unhealthy occupation, and many found the habit of kneading dough with hands and feet sufficiently revolting. Bakeries in Britain, for the most part, were underground, hot, unventilated and undrained, gas-lit and clogged with the fumes of the weary men who worked there. The bakeries in India were even dirtier and revolting, being, generally, confined rooms, with a temperature above 100 degrees Celsius, dark and unventilated to a degree, and in which the workers kneaded the dough with their hands and feet. .

Moore inspected the bakery at Poona Station and found that its employees took “little trouble to keep them clean”. He wondered if Dr. Dauglish’s method could be tried in Poona.

The other “defect”, according to Moore, frequently encountered in Indian bread, was a large amount of sand in it, stemming mainly from the immense amounts of sand that floated through the atmosphere during hot plains winds. This dust penetrated everywhere, and the ground corn at these times could not be free of sand. The gritty bread hurt the soldier’s teeth; to avoid the unpleasant jerking sensation of chewing gritty matter, they frequently “bolted” the food of the soldiers, and thus indigestion in a double way, diarrhea or dysentery were excited.

Poona station then housed a permanent dentist. Moore recommended that two more dentists be employed at the station to treat the soldiers.

Moore was unhappy with the cooking arrangements at Poona Station. It was performed by Indian cooks who, according to him, paid little attention to cleanliness. Raw meat was inspected daily by officers, who also frequently saw it cooked and served on the men’s table; but little was known about the treatment benefits received “during the interval”.

Moore suggested that an almirah should be provided for the food of each mess, and not only the rations, but the kitchens and “bawarchies” should be inspected daily, that a check should be placed on the handling of these, which , “like the witch in Macbeth, could be frequently seen, in barracks and hospital kitchens, concocting nasty mayhem, of which the authorities literally knew nothing”.

At Poona, the food of the junior soldiers was brought to the table, not on crockery, but on dishes of common earth, of the material from which the water “glasses” were made, and which, because of their porosity, impossible to stay clean. They became saturated with daily use and, over time, were unpleasant to the nose and palate. Moore insisted that crockery, glass and even tablecloths be made available in every European mess and that the canteen fund be made available for this purpose.

The same diet and lack of appetite induced by the hot and enervating climate frequently led men to prepare or have prepared hot curries and stews, so greasy with ghee and rancid butter, and so hot with cayenne pepper. , that it was truly a matter of wonder to their European superiors how such mixtures were retained on the stomach. According to Moore, not only did these induce dyspepsia and indigestion, engender thirst and thus set the stage for intemperance, but the pungent spices seemed to have a direct influence on alcohol and damage the liver. He felt it would be hard to deny that the soldier made any dishes, but that they were prepared under supervision so that the spices and hot peppers could be kept within due limits.

Many of Moore’s recommendations were eventually implemented at Poona Station. Other stations were not so quick to follow. But his recommendations made Poona Cantonment one of the most hygienic stations in the British kingdom.

Chinmay Damle is a scientific researcher and cooking enthusiast. He writes here about the culinary culture of Pune. He can be contacted at chinmay.damle@gmail.com

]]>
Govt Workshop Roorkee links to 1857 Sepoy Mutiny and more | Dehradun News https://www.frontierforts.org/govt-workshop-roorkee-links-to-1857-sepoy-mutiny-and-more-dehradun-news/ Mon, 30 May 2022 23:13:00 +0000 https://www.frontierforts.org/govt-workshop-roorkee-links-to-1857-sepoy-mutiny-and-more-dehradun-news/ Roorkee: With huge British-era structures across 103 bigha lands, Government Workshop Roorkee (GWR) certainly has an interesting past and a vital connection to the Sepoy Indian Mutiny of 1857. Established in 1843 by Sir Proby Thomas Cautley, the GWR was intended to facilitate the construction work by the East India Company of the Gangnahar Canal […]]]>

Roorkee: With huge British-era structures across 103 bigha lands, Government Workshop Roorkee (GWR) certainly has an interesting past and a vital connection to the Sepoy Indian Mutiny of 1857.
Established in 1843 by Sir Proby Thomas Cautley, the GWR was intended to facilitate the construction work by the East India Company of the Gangnahar Canal and roads through the region. But as the revolt spread from Meerut on 10 May 1857, its impact also reached Roorkee. Some native soldiers stationed in Roorkee rebelled and reportedly set fire to a barracks, which was based on the current campus of IIT-Roorkee. The barracks had been used as the residence of some British military students who had enrolled at the local Thomason College of Engineering (TCE).
Incidentally, a senior officer of the local Bengal Sappers and Miners Corps (now BEG&C), Major R Baird Smith, who happened to be a Superintendent of Canals at Roorkee, hastily settled the British women and their children in the several workshops of the workshop. ‘magazines’ (basements) for their safety. Among them was the wife of Colonel R MacLagan who had given birth to a son in one of those dark, drab rooms.
A plaque recounting this incident is still alive on the wall. Col MacLagan was the first Director of TCE at this time. TCE, which was founded as Roorkee College in 1847, is today IIT-Roorkee. The plaque here reads: ‘In this room, during the mutiny of 1857, Mrs. MacLagan, wife of Colonel R MacLagan, gave birth to a son. Colonel MacLagan was for many years Principal of Thomason College. ”
Colonel MacLagan, who had four sons and two daughters, rose to the rank of general during his last years of military service and his youngest son, Edward Douglas MacLagan, who also became a general in the British Army like his father, had established MacLagan. Engineering College, Lahore in 1923, which is now known as the University of Engineering and Technology (UET)-Lahore in Pakistan.
Accounts of the immediate effect of the Sepoy mutiny on Roorkee are well documented in two books. One is “God’s Own – The Bengal Sappers” by Col RB Khanna and the other is “History Of Thomason College Of Engineering” by KV Mital.
According to these two books, only two to four sapper companies remained at Roorkee after May 10, 1857, and “on the night of May 13-14 a barracks occupied by British student soldiers of the TCE was burned down. by the rebels. Frightened by this development, Smith and MacLagan saw the fortified compound of the Canal Foundry Workshops (now GWR) as a “safe haven” for families of the local British community who numbered in their fifties.
Mital in chapter 4 of his book states that “here in the workshops MacLagan and Baird Smith have been blessed with a son and a daughter, respectively”.
Interestingly, the birth dates of the children are missing not only on the plate but also in Mital’s book. “Since there is no written documentation available in the archives of our establishment (workshop), everything that was available for our predecessors had been put in place as information on the plate,” said Shishir Gupta, executive engineer at GWR.
An online archive from the Center for South Asian Studies at the University of Cambridge shows that night patrols by sappers were increased on May 15 and on the same day women and children were sent to the workshops. And Patricia, wife of Col MacLagan, gave birth to a son on May 22 in the workshop and they finally returned to their cabin on June 8. About 10 days later, the child was baptized as Charles Patrick Dalrymple.
Thus, the stories of TCE, Bengal Sappers and GWR are intertwined. But while the history of Bengal Sappers and TCE is well documented, GWR’s is not. “The GWR is a living monument of industrial archaeology. This majestic entity should be further developed as a tourist spot for our future generations,” said local architect Mujeeb Malik, 62.

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL NETWORKS

FacebookTwitterinstagramKOO APPYOUTUBE

]]>
Today’s Headlines and Comments – Lawfare https://www.frontierforts.org/todays-headlines-and-comments-lawfare/ Thu, 19 May 2022 17:40:47 +0000 https://www.frontierforts.org/todays-headlines-and-comments-lawfare/ Subscribe to receive this newsletter straight to your inbox. The first Russian soldier to be tried for war crimes in Ukraine admitted to killing an unarmed civilian, reports the Wall Street Journal. In Ukraine’s first war crimes trial since the Russian invasion began, Vadim Shishimarin has confessed to shooting and killing a 62-year-old unarmed man […]]]>

Subscribe to receive this newsletter straight to your inbox.

The first Russian soldier to be tried for war crimes in Ukraine admitted to killing an unarmed civilian, reports the Wall Street Journal. In Ukraine’s first war crimes trial since the Russian invasion began, Vadim Shishimarin has confessed to shooting and killing a 62-year-old unarmed man in the Ukrainian town of Chupakhivka. The trial will likely continue over the next few days as Ukrainian prosecutors and Shishimarin’s lawyers debate whether or not the shooting qualifies as a war crime. If Shishimarin is convicted, he faces a life sentence.

Ukrainian authorities have filed war crimes charges against two other Russian soldiers, writing the Washington Post. Prosecutors allege the two soldiers worked together to target Ukrainian civilians in the Kharkiv region using a truck-mounted rocket launcher. One of the defendants allegedly drove the truck while the other used the rocket launcher to shoot at civilians.

President Biden officially endorses Finland and Sweden’s bids to join NATO, according to the New York Times. Biden promised that while considering their alliance candidacies, the United States will work with Finland and Sweden to help protect against any threats to the nations’ shared security. Biden also stressed that the United States would help Finland and Sweden “deter and confront aggression or the threat of aggression.”

The Justice Department submitted a request to the House Select Committee investigating the January 6 attack on the United States Capitol for transcripts of the closed-door interviews conducted by the panel., according to the New York Times. The House committee – which lacks the ability to prosecute those suspected of being involved in the attack – has reportedly conducted more than 1,000 closed-door interviews so far in its investigation. According to the Times, the Justice Department plans to potentially use the transcripts as evidence to pursue potential criminal cases or new leads in investigations of those involved in the Jan. 6 attack. Assistants to the panel representatives have not yet reached an agreement. with the Department of Justice on the content and amount of material that will be shared.

President Biden traveled to Asia on Thursday to meet with allies in South Korea and Japan, writing CNN. In his first trip on the continent as president, Biden reportedly intends to work to strengthen alliances amid global instability exacerbated by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. In Seoul, Biden will meet with South Korea’s newly elected president, and in Tokyo, he will hold bilateral talks with the Japanese prime minister as well as other leaders from Japan, Australia and India. In the meetings, Biden is expected to address growing nuclear threats from North Korea and will try to expand economic cooperation, especially in the production of advanced technologies.

The Justice Department charged a US citizen and four Chinese intelligence agents with spying, reports Reuters. According to the indictment, Wang Shujun, a New York resident, worked with the Chinese Ministry of State Security (MSS) to illegally collect information on Chinese dissidents, human rights defenders and pro-democracy activists living in the United States. The four MSS officials named in the indictment – Feng He, Jie Ji, Ming Li and Keqing Lu – remain at large. Wang is in custody.

ICYMI: Yesterday, Straight

Jen Patja Howell share an episode of the Lawfare Podcast which featured a conversation between Quinta Jurecic, Roger Parloff and Jonathan David Shaub about the Steve Bannon contempt suit.

Robert Chesney and Steve Vladeck share an episode of the National Security Law Podcast in which they discussed the leak(s) associated with the Supreme Court’s Dobbs case and what a war crimes analysis applied to the operation led by the Russian GRU to shut down the Ukrainian network during the period after the occupation of Crimea but before the current invasion.

Jordan Schneider share an episode of ChinaTalk which featured a conversation with Erich Schwartzel on the world of Chinese cinema, Chinese films abroad and China in Hollywood.

Myroslav Layuk discussed the deportation of Crimean Tatars and other genocides committed by Russia in Ukraine.

Bryce Klehm post the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction’s interim report on the collapse of the Afghan security forces.

Klehm too post the report of the Office of the Inspector General of the Ministry of Defense on the reprisals against Colonel Yevgeny Vindman.

howell too share an episode of Rational security in which Jurecic, Alan Rozenshtein and Scott R. Anderson were joined by Klehm to discuss the recent mass shooting in Buffalo, New York, and the House Select Committee investigating the January 6 decision to subpoena five House Republicans.

Katherine Pompilio post a lawsuit filed by a group of Wisconsin voters against twelve individuals who allegedly conspired to nullify the results of the 2020 presidential election.

Rohini Kurup post a lawsuit filed by the Justice Department seeking to compel Republican casino magnate and megadonor Steve Wynn to register as a Chinese government agent.

Kurup too post the replacement indictment of Thomas Barrack, former adviser to former President Trump, which includes new allegations of his alleged efforts to try to influence the Trump campaign and administration at the direction of UAE officials United.

E-mail the Roundup team noteworthy law and security-related articles to include, and follow us on Twitter and Facebook for additional comments on these issues. Register to receive Lawfare in your inbox. Consult the relevant job offers on our job board.

]]>
Kalonzo Musyoka, the buffalo soldier, dances to please everyone https://www.frontierforts.org/kalonzo-musyoka-the-buffalo-soldier-dances-to-please-everyone/ Wed, 18 May 2022 10:00:42 +0000 https://www.frontierforts.org/kalonzo-musyoka-the-buffalo-soldier-dances-to-please-everyone/ The buffalo man enjoyed a good dance, the fire dance of the middle path. You remember this amazing guy, his name was Fella Anikulapo Ransome Kuti from Nigeria, who sang the fire song called Afro. He was the cousin of another great man called Oluwole Soyinka, or simply Wole. Now Anikulapo was not a jagajaga […]]]>

The buffalo man enjoyed a good dance, the fire dance of the middle path. You remember this amazing guy, his name was Fella Anikulapo Ransome Kuti from Nigeria, who sang the fire song called Afro. He was the cousin of another great man called Oluwole Soyinka, or simply Wole.

Now Anikulapo was not a jagajaga person, who had fun with people. When a big shot refused to pay his moni, or let’s say money, he led four extractors into the high chief’s Muthaiga of Lagos. He coated the whole place with the waste water from the extractor. When the big man asked, “Na wat be dis oh?” Fella said to him (pardon the language oh, but that’s not the truth oh), “You give me shit, I give you shit.”

You remember how Fella, the son of a tough Nigerian woman who fought for independence, once said, “If you call an African woman, don’t go. She will say that I am a lady oh! If you tell her to dance, “She’s going to dance Madame danse.” She will say he is equal to man. She’s going to have a cigar before everyone else” and “She’s going to make you open the door for me, she’s going to make her wash a plate for the kitchen.

But the African woman is “gonna do the fire dance,” the amazing guy said. She can’t dance Lady dance. The Buffalo Soldier, otherwise known as Man Stevo, aka Kalonzo wa Musyoka of Tseikuru, dances the political fire dance. Now some people are not happy that he dances this way and that way, katikati, like the windshield wipers of a giant truck. They say he confuses them, because his dance is hard to understand. They want him to slow down and do Lady dancing that they can understand.

As a result, Wa Musyoka alternated between fire dancing and ladies’ dancing, just to please everyone. You see, Mr. Odinga, otherwise known as Baba Raila Amolo son of Taurus, tried to run with someone to the House on the Hill. But he doesn’t know who to run with. He’s assembled a team of seven leaders to tell him who’s the best runner in the whole land, so he can run with him, or her, to the top of the Hill. Before they can even say the word “Run!” Wa Musyoka, the Buffalo man, lashed out at them, saying they were doing anything.

“You don’t need any team to tell you who the best runner is. I ran with Baba twice. And I can run with him again. Leave this matter to me and Muigai wa Kenyatta, we will settle this, because we know the best runner in the whole country. Without me, Baba won’t go anywhere,” said the man who ran twice with Baba, but was abandoned at the Jordan River, when Baba saw giant crocodiles and ran away in the opposite direction.

The Buffalo Soldier Wiper got stuck at the Crocodile River, not knowing what to do. Meanwhile, Baba had found Muigai wa Kenyatta, otherwise known as the Crocodile Herder. Baba has made peace with Muigai and his crocodiles. Muigai agreed that in future he would eliminate his crocodiles, so that Baba could safely cross to the Promised Land. It was also agreed that the next time Baba wanted to go to the Promised Land, Muigai would come.

But to make it smoother, Muigai wa Kenyatta wa Muigai wa Ngengi would also bring a team of tough mountaineers, to accompany them beyond the Jordan. One of them would be a tough female athlete, who would give all the crocodiles near the Jordan a real run for their money and their crocodile tears. Now when Muigai wa Kenyatta wants to keep his promise to Baba, Man Stevo comes out of nowhere to bump into Muigai and Baba. Anataka Kupitia Katikati.

You see, the buffalo soldier is very good kwa kupitia katikati. That’s why some people started calling it funny stuff. Just imagine someone rude calling her a vegetable name, watermelon ati sijui! Another pumpkin ati. These are unfair names for someone who saw only good chances of succeeding katikati ya watu. He saw one before Raila Odinga, before Mr. Odinga became Baba. There was Mr. Odinga and Mzee Mwai Kibaki. Mzee Kibaki and the future Baba had participated in another race at the Big House on the Hill in December 2007. The referee announced that the Mzee had won. But the future Baba says, “Hapana, the race has been stolen.

Trouble broke out. The place that started to burn. People were running in all directions, like windshield wipers. Some were killed in the uproar. There were real troubles in the republic. Some peace pundits started telling future Baba to have a handshake with Mzee Kibaki, but Baba started playing hard to get. Before he could step back and go for the handshake, he discovered Wa Musyoka already had pita katikati and shook Mzee Kibaki’s hand. Now Wa Musyoka sat smiling next to Mzee Kibaki. He invited Bwana Odinga to come and shake hands with Kibaki!

The future Baba reluctantly accepted the handshake, after another girl called Condoleezza Rice came to our big city in a giant plane written on “Airforce 2”. She threatened to do very scary things if Baba and Mzee Mwai did not shake hands. So, the two just shook hands, in front of a messenger called Dr. Kofi. They also agreed to make new laws, otherwise known as the revision of the Constitution. But when they started, Wa Musyoka decided he didn’t know if the new laws were good or bad. So again he decided to pitia katikati ya hiyo constitution.

Wa Musyoka’s motto is always “Katikati all the way”. It therefore behaves like windshield wipers. He wipes here and there. You can never say yuko hapa, to the pale. It’s just everywhere and nowhere, like real windshield wipers. It just says “Swish-swash”. Then he said, “I will not go for an interview, I will run with Baba.” But the next day, he goes anyway. He can also say, “Uh, if I support Baba, then I am the most stupid man in the world.” But the next day he will say, “I am going to campaign hardest for Baba.

Wow! It’s the real bison soldier! He is a man of many worlds. He is a man-buffalo, who fights for his survival, as Master Robert Nester Marley said. It was flown from Africa called Tseikuru and brought to America called Nairobi. And he was fighting for the finish, fighting for big things. As Nester, otherwise known as Bob, said, “When I analyze the stench, to me it makes a lot of sense.”

Yeah, that makes a lot of sense. When you know your story, you will know where you came from. The story of Man Stevo is a long story of katikati ya watu na hali trading. So he swaps katikati ya akina Iron Lady, aka Martha Karua and her shadow, Sabina Chege. It also goes through a man named Peter Kenneth and another named Ali Hassan, mwana wa Joho.

When you know your story, you know where you are going. Man Stevo knows where he is going. Or maybe he doesn’t know. He’s just hapo katikati, enjoying the fire dance. No one dares go make Man Stevo open the door for me oh!

Dr. Barrack Muluka is a Strategic Communications Advisor.

]]>
Voice of the Veterans: Dave Schoenian | WTRF https://www.frontierforts.org/voice-of-the-veterans-dave-schoenian-wtrf/ Tue, 17 May 2022 20:17:17 +0000 https://www.frontierforts.org/voice-of-the-veterans-dave-schoenian-wtrf/ GLEN DALE, W.Va. (WTRF) — Many veterans may say that service doesn’t end when you’re released. If your experiences don’t stay with you, the commitment to helping others does. That’s certainly how Harry David Schoenian feels. As a leader in Vietnam, he pledged to ensure the safety of his men. At home, he always honors […]]]>

GLEN DALE, W.Va. (WTRF) — Many veterans may say that service doesn’t end when you’re released. If your experiences don’t stay with you, the commitment to helping others does.

That’s certainly how Harry David Schoenian feels.

As a leader in Vietnam, he pledged to ensure the safety of his men. At home, he always honors this promise to serve his brothers.

1967 I put on a uniform. I took an oath to this country. This uniform has never come off, ever. I could physically hang it in the closet. I might have turned off the light, but that uniform never came off.

Dave Schoenian, veteran

Physically, Dave Schoenian no longer wears his military uniform. Emotionally, he never took it away when it comes to preserving the memory of friends he lost in Vietnam, keeping in touch with those who are still there, serving the community or giving back a last salute to a soldier.

I won’t let them be forgotten by Charlie Company. It will not happen.

Dave Schoenian, veteran

His life changed forever after he was drafted into the army.

Coming from a family with several members who served in World War II, in various branches, I had never considered the fact that I was going to be drafted. Actually, I didn’t know what the Vietnam War was. I didn’t pay that much attention to it.

Dave Schoenian, veteran

Schoenian recalls working in Illinois with his father on a construction site when he received his draft notice from Marshall County.

I didn’t have to go to Vietnam. I was an only child. I could have gotten away with it, but after I finished training, I said I was no better than the others. I’m going.

Dave Schoenian, veteran

He went to Fort Bragg for basic training, Vietnamese infantry readiness at Fort Polk, then NCO (non-commissioned officer) school at Fort Benning, where he was trained by Vietnam veterans .

Schoenian would be part of the 90th Replacement Company of the 9th Infantry Division, 2nd Brigade. Once in Vietnam, he was assigned to the Mobile Riverine Force, which was a naval task force. Schoenian spent 12 months in the Mekong Delta as part of this force.

Army troops would barrack on navy ships on the widest part of the river. When it was time to go on a mission, they were brought on landing craft through narrow channels.

They can hear you coming five miles away and they’re going to get hit. They’re going to get hit back and forth.

Dave Schoenian, veteran

Schoenian recalls the tense moments in the canals waiting for the landing craft doors to open.

What we got into was just heartbreaking. When that ramp goes down, you don’t know what’s down there. You have to navigate the mud, get into the jungle foliage, and you don’t know who’s in there.

It was quite an experience and I will give credit to the Navy. They had it as hard as we did because when these things came under attack, these rockets penetrated these metal turrets and everything and that’s where I got hurt.

Dave Schoenian, veteran

Schoenian explains that it was only a few months after his stay in Vietnam. It was a bad week with multiple losses in his business. And that moment would mark the beginning of his combat experience.

I just traded places with a guy and when the rocket hit him he blew his leg off. Tossed me in the back of the craft with about six others and was the least injured.

Dave Schoenian, Veteran

Schoenian recovered and was able to return to duty.

But that’s when I knew it was going to be a long year.

Dave Schoenian, veteran

Schoenian was part of 49 combat missions, plus all amphibious missions with Navy ships. Each time he spent a few days on this mission, then he was picked up and sent back to the ship.

Beyond the job given to him, he says the biggest mission was to survive and protect his men.

It’s just a difficult thing when you have to wrap a body and put it in a poncho. You don’t get used to it, but you don’t have time. The missions continue. You don’t give up. You don’t call time out. You keep moving. You continue to fight.

Dave Schoenian, veteran

He went to great lengths to do so.

As Schoenian sat before his medals recalling those experiences in Vietnam, there is only one medal that really matters, according to Schoenian, awarded for saving two men from a fast current.

They were my men. They were swept away. By the grace of God I found them underwater in full gear, I was able to bring them both back.

Dave Schoenian, Veteran

After a year in Vietnam, Schoenian knew it was time to come home.

I had been promoted to staff sergeant, platoon sergeant, and over the past few months I just decided that if I went back and did the same job, I probably wouldn’t come home.

Dave Schoenian, Veteran

He was released in July 1969 and was home in Glen Dale within three days.

Although he physically left the country, the memories never left him. Schoenian says it affected him throughout his life. He struggled with the guilt and trauma of survivors who never went away. He thanks his family, his friends and especially his wife for helping him get out of it.

Being a veteran’s wife is one of the hardest jobs because they go through PTSD and nights. My wife just couldn’t touch me at night. Eventually we had to sleep separately for a while because I was fighting all night.

Dave Schoenian, Veteran

Although he got the help he needed years later, Schoenian said he never wanted to forget his experiences.

A lot of people say that in the short time you were in Vietnam, how can that control what you do? Well, this stuff is forever. I don’t want to forget my dead or wounded men. I don’t want to close this. I pay homage to them. They took me home.

Dave Schoenian, Veteran

Schoenian still maintains contact with members of Charlie Company.

He serves the veteran community in that area in many ways and told 7News that his phone is always on for any veteran who needs him at all hours of the day.

When talking about his service now, Schoenian praises his time as a member of the Military Order of the Purple Heart.

This Purple Heart group, these prisoners of war from Iwo Jima, Korea, accepted me. I knew then that I had succeeded. They always said in Vietnam “Welcome home”. Well, I was coming home.

Dave Schoenian, Veteran

He may be more committed to being part of the Moundsville Veterans Honor Guard.

It’s an honor for me to bend down and give this family member this folded flag and give him the words he wants here. God gave me this gift so I could do it and I’m proud to do it.

Dave Schoenian, Veteran

Schoenian considers it an honor to present a veteran’s family with the folded flag, and said it is a gift from God to be able to do so.

]]>
PHOTO GALLERY: Ceremony marking the centenary of the handover of Camp Curragh to British forces – Page 1 of 19 https://www.frontierforts.org/photo-gallery-ceremony-marking-the-centenary-of-the-handover-of-camp-curragh-to-british-forces-page-1-of-19/ Mon, 16 May 2022 18:35:43 +0000 https://www.frontierforts.org/photo-gallery-ceremony-marking-the-centenary-of-the-handover-of-camp-curragh-to-british-forces-page-1-of-19/ PHOTOS BY AISHLING CONWAY Hundreds of serving and retired servicemen and members of the public attended a major ceremony on Monday to mark the centenary of the handover of Camp Curragh from the British Army to the Free State Army. Ireland.At 10 a.m. on Tuesday 16 May 1922 the camp was handed over to a […]]]>

PHOTOS BY AISHLING CONWAY

Hundreds of serving and retired servicemen and members of the public attended a major ceremony on Monday to mark the centenary of the handover of Camp Curragh from the British Army to the Free State Army. Ireland.
At 10 a.m. on Tuesday 16 May 1922 the camp was handed over to a group of Irish troops commanded by Lieutenant General JJ ‘Ginger’ O’Connell.
Relatives of Lieutenant General O’Connell were present in McDermott Square to witness an itinerary of events reflecting the historic day 100 years ago.
The event began with a formal address in the Main Barracks Square by the General Officer Commanding the Defense Forces Training Center (DFTC), Brigadier General Brendan McGuinness.
At midday the national flag on the water tower was hoisted, followed by the unveiling of plaques on the Curragh Fire Station building to mark the important centenary.
Music was provided by the Army No 1 Band who performed Amhrán na bhFiann before a flyover of two Air Corps aircraft was conducted.
A lone piper then played the ballad, The Curragh of Kildare.
A reception followed for attendees along with an army of army vehicles such as the “Slievenamon” armored car associated with the death of Michael Collins in the Beal na mBlath ambush in August 1922.
A local retired soldier, born in the Curragh camp, said he was delighted to be invited to the centenary ceremony.
Pat Lynch, who turns 97 in July, told the chef: “My dad Pat Lynch Snr was serving in the Curragh after the transfer from the British Army and he had living quarters here.
I was born here in 1925. I looked after the Sliabh na mBan car. I was part of a group of people who helped restore and maintain the vehicle.
I would drive him to military shows over the years.
Pat, who retired in 1990, now lives in Kilcullen.
Pat’s son Noel also revealed that his daughter Emily also had a connection to the car as she painted the lettering on the body.
Noel said, “It’s another generation of the family that is associated with Sliabh na mBan!”
Curragh’s fourth-generation hairdresser Fintan Darling, who was also present with his father Reggie, said it was important to remember the important history of the Curragh camp.

Mr Darling said: ‘My family’s history over many generations is intertwined with the camp and so today is an emotional day for my family as well as a very important day for the Defense Force.’

Defense Force personnel are involved in several local ceremonies nationwide throughout this centennial year, involving Army, Air Corps and Naval Service personnel.
Public officials who attended Monday’s event included Minister of State Martin Heydon, a retired army officer and TD Cathal Berry along with other local politicians.
Pupils and teachers from schools across the Curragh were also invited to attend and watch the proceedings.

]]>