Principal fort – Frontier Forts http://www.frontierforts.org/ Wed, 18 May 2022 22:31:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://www.frontierforts.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-09T150409.369-150x150.png Principal fort – Frontier Forts http://www.frontierforts.org/ 32 32 Lewisville ISD Board of Directors Appoints 4 New Directors https://www.frontierforts.org/lewisville-isd-board-of-directors-appoints-4-new-directors/ Wed, 18 May 2022 19:49:00 +0000 https://www.frontierforts.org/lewisville-isd-board-of-directors-appoints-4-new-directors/ The Lewisville ISD Board of Directors approved four administrative positions at its May 17 meeting. (File photo from Community Impact newspaper) The Lewisville ISD Board of Directors approved four new directors at its May 17 meeting. Appointments include a principal of schools, a chief of colleges, an executive director of finance and a campus principal […]]]>

The Lewisville ISD Board of Directors approved four administrative positions at its May 17 meeting. (File photo from Community Impact newspaper)

The Lewisville ISD Board of Directors approved four new directors at its May 17 meeting.

Appointments include a principal of schools, a chief of colleges, an executive director of finance and a campus principal at BB Owen Elementary School.

Head of schools

The board unanimously approved Lori Litchfield as superintendent of district schools.

“I am thrilled with this new opportunity,” Litchfield said in a district press release. “I am thrilled to work alongside an incredible group of leaders and all of the schools in our district. I have grown professionally with LISD and look forward to continuing to serve our students, parents, staff and community.

Litchfield was the district’s elementary schools chief, which she had held since 2017. In that role, she oversaw and provided support to 20 elementary schools in the district, according to the statement. She has nearly 30 years of experience in public education, all spent at LISD.

In the new role, Litchfield will oversee counseling and social work services, special education, professional learning and on-campus support services in addition to heads of elementary, middle and high schools.

head of colleges

The board unanimously approved Chantell Upshaw as the district’s new college leader. She replaces Leigh Ann Lewis, who recently announced her retirement.

“I am thrilled to have the opportunity to serve our LISD community in this role,” Upshaw said in a press release. “I have spent most of my career at LISD, so to be able to partner with our amazing leadership team to help guide our students, families, and staff through exceptional learning experiences is truly a great honor. .”

Upshaw most recently served as Director at Marcus High School 9th ​​Grade Campusa position she had held since 2014, according to a district press release.

In her new role, Upshaw will be responsible for providing support and leadership to 15 middle school principals in the district as well as other programs such as the virtual learning academy and high school summer school.

Chief Financial Officer

The board approved Amber Lasseigne as the district’s executive director of finance. She replaces Rosemary Trevino, who recently announced her retirement.

“LISD has an incredible reputation for the financial health of public schools,” Lasseigne said in a press release. “I can’t wait to join the team.”

Lasseigne joins the district from Allen ISDwhere she served as executive director of finance since 2018. At Allen, she oversaw financial operations for the district, including budgeting, accounting, purchasing, payroll and other finance-related areas, according to the release. .

Principal of BB Owen Elementary School

The board approved Jennifer Barentine as the new director of B. B. Owen Primary School. She replaces Jennifer Spitzer, who recently announced her retirement.

“I am humbled and honored to join the Bobcat family as the new principal of BB Owen Elementary,” Barentine said in a press release. “I look forward to serving the community and continuing to build the love of learning for BB Owen students.”

Barentine was previously deputy director at Ethridge Primary School, a position she had held for seven years. She is entering her 28th year in public education, which has been entirely at LISD, according to a new release.

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Putting Fort Lauderdale’s Successful Team Back First — RISMedia https://www.frontierforts.org/putting-fort-lauderdales-successful-team-back-first-rismedia/ Tue, 17 May 2022 05:18:51 +0000 https://www.frontierforts.org/putting-fort-lauderdales-successful-team-back-first-rismedia/ By the time he graduated from the University of Florida at Tampa, Josh Dotoli knew he was an entrepreneur at heart. Having worked with a mentor who managed and rehabilitated properties, he believed real estate was his calling, and he quickly proved the point in his successful first year with a boutique business in Fort […]]]>

By the time he graduated from the University of Florida at Tampa, Josh Dotoli knew he was an entrepreneur at heart. Having worked with a mentor who managed and rehabilitated properties, he believed real estate was his calling, and he quickly proved the point in his successful first year with a boutique business in Fort Lauderdale.

Recruited four years ago by Compass Real Estate after six years of success with another high-end company, he and his wife, Dayana, whom he had met in the industry, decided to combine their skills in a concerted effort. to grow and grow their business.

Today the Dotoli Groupa data-driven Compass-affiliated team that has grown to 11, is one of the best-selling real estate teams in South Florida, with $150 million in sales and 100 closed deals in 2021 and a passion for team-wide to support the communities they serve.

First on the register is a partnership with Habitat for Humanity of Broward County and a commitment to fund and build a new home for a local family in need.

Barbara Pronin: It’s a huge commitment Josh, and we’ll get into the details, but can we start by saying a bit more about your team?

Josh Dotoli: Sure. We are a tight-knit team of 11, with seven of us directly assisting buyers, sellers, investors and tenant clients, and four involved full-time in administration, marketing and customer support.

PA: With such a large team, communication is paramount. How are you going to handle this?

JD: I am in daily contact with all my collaborators, and weekly with the whole team. Fortunately, we have a loyal and collaborative culture, which not only helps us stay productive, but also ensures that our customers can benefit from 24/7 support. You know, in this industry you have to be “active” all the time, and you can sometimes feel a bit isolated. Working together and supporting each other means each of us can have our own life knowing that someone is always there for our customers.

PA: In your opinion, what differentiates the Dotoli group from the competition?

JD: Two or three things, I think. First, we are all experienced high-end professionals, each of us dedicated to caring for our customers. Our clients don’t see us as sellers, but as trusted real estate advisors, and we’re very proud that the lion’s share of the business we do comes to us from repeat and referral clients. Additionally, Compass is an elite brokerage and a premier brokerage in Broward County. So we have many quality resources and a proud reputation behind us.

PA: As your team evolves, Josh, does your leadership role evolve as well?

JD: To some extent, yes. With a fully functional team working to the max, I am now able to do coaching and mentoring, which I really appreciate. It meant a lot to me when I started out and I’m happy to be able to take on this role. Plus, I have a bit more time to strategize and research new ways to grow our business and keep an eye out for investment opportunities.

PA: So why did you decide to support Habitat for Humanity of Broward County?

JD: I love this community. It’s where we live, where we raise our family, where we are proud to serve a real estate clientele. We know how important home ownership is to every family’s future, and Habitat of Broward helps hard-working families achieve that American Dream. They offer a helping hand, not a handout, to families who are willing to roll up their sleeves and work with volunteers to build the house from scratch and get a zero percent mortgage once they learned financial and life skills. training. It’s a concept we really applaud, and we can’t think of a better way to give back.

PA: What is the extent of your team’s involvement?

JD: We’re donating in honor of every customer we serve in 2022, but we’re also ready to roll up our own sleeves and pull out the hammer and nails when it’s time to kick off the build. The finished product, which we hope to complete by the end of the fourth quarter of this year, will be a one-story, three-bedroom, two-bathroom home, approximately 1,300 square feet, in a community with two parks and 76 townhouses on nine acres of land. There will be a public dedication ceremony honoring the chosen Broward family when the house is ready to move into.

PA: It’s an awesome project. Congratulations.

JD: Thank you. We are happy to be part of it.

PA: And the team, Josh. Looking to grow in the future?

JD: Not immediately. We set the bar high. But you know there’s always room for the right people.

Here’s a look at one of the luxury properties recently sold by the Dotoli Group in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, and how it got listed:

2523 Laguna Terrace
“2523 Laguna Terrace is located in Fort Lauderdale’s most exclusive neighborhood, Harbor Beach. This magnificent gated estate features four bedrooms, five and a half bathrooms, an office and a three-car garage. It was built in 2015 with a 120ft concrete dock on a wide canal with no fixed bridges and minutes from the ocean, making it a boater’s paradise. Josh Dotoli, DOTOLI Group Director at Compass, represented the buyer in this transaction.

Sold for $9.8 million

4 bedrooms
5.5 Bathrooms

4,913 square feet

Barbara Pronin is editor-in-chief of RISMedia.

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For the third time in two years, Fort McMurray High School wins major STEM scholarship https://www.frontierforts.org/for-the-third-time-in-two-years-fort-mcmurray-high-school-wins-major-stem-scholarship/ Sun, 15 May 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://www.frontierforts.org/for-the-third-time-in-two-years-fort-mcmurray-high-school-wins-major-stem-scholarship/ For the third time in two years, a Fort McMurray high school student has won a major scholarship for students planning to pursue post-secondary studies in science, technology, engineering or math. “I thought there was probably a five percent chance I would get it,” said Rion Schulz, a 12th grader at McTavish Public High School, […]]]>

For the third time in two years, a Fort McMurray high school student has won a major scholarship for students planning to pursue post-secondary studies in science, technology, engineering or math.

“I thought there was probably a five percent chance I would get it,” said Rion Schulz, a 12th grader at McTavish Public High School, who put his name forward as a candidate for the prestigious scholarship. Schulich of $100,000.

In his candidacy essay, he wrote about his interest in green energy and his passion for science and technology.

When he found out he had won one of the scholarships, Schulz was “very shocked” and said his parents cried tears of happiness.

“I’ve worked so hard in the last 12 years of my school life that I feel like I’ve come to this moment,” Schulz said.

Schulz worked for Greenplanet Energy Analytics, an Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation green energy company. Through this work, Schulz has contributed to the Three Nations Energy (3NE) Solar Farm in Fort Chipewyan and its cabin solar research project.

In the solar cabin project, he calculated how much money a solar panel would save each homeowner compared to chasing a diesel generator.

Schulz got the job through his father’s friend.

“At the time, I only had experience at A&W serving burgers…he decided to give it a shot,” Schulz said.

Extracurriculars make the difference

Laura MacEachen, a school counselor who helps students with scholarships, said the McTavish School appointed Schulz because of his high grades and extracurricular activities.

She said it’s a lot of work to apply for scholarships, which discourages many students. But in the past two years, three McTavish students have won six-figure prizes.

In 2021, Tanisha Kadia won a Loran scholarship of $100,000 and Maryam Tsegaye won the Breakthrough Junior Challenge, a prize worth nearly C$500,000.

MacEachen said the school encourages student involvement in the community, noting that big rewards often depend on extracurricular activities.

“I think this city has a really good feel for it too, so it’s easy to get involved,” MacEachen said. “There are a lot of opportunities if students want to take advantage of them.”

Laura MacEachen helps students at McTavish Public High School apply for scholarships. (Jamie Malbeuf/CBC)

She said the students who have won the big scholarships are exceptional and “they would do well without it, but they will do even better with the award.”

Thomas Andrews, acting principal of the McTavish School, said the news gave him a “sense of pride”.

“We’re just lucky to have some really amazing students at our school,” Andrews said.

Thomas Andrews, the school’s acting principal, wrote Schulz’s letter of recommendation. (Jamie Malbeuf/CBC)

Being in Fort McMurray, Andrews said students have a unique opportunity to see a lot of science and technology.

“There was no doubt in my mind that he [Schulz] was a deserving candidate, but to think that another student would see so much success in a scholarship next year was definitely a surprise,” Andrews said.

Andrews has known Schulz since elementary school and he wrote the letter of recommendation for Schulz’s scholarship application.

Schulz will now go to the University of Alberta to study engineering and continue his work in green energy.

“I like to see the trees and the water…if we continue down this path of oil and gas…my children and grandchildren won’t be able to enjoy the same beauty as us. So I want to preserve that,” says Schulz.

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College of Engineering and Community Partners Launch Ride 4 Smilies Program in Fort Smith https://www.frontierforts.org/college-of-engineering-and-community-partners-launch-ride-4-smilies-program-in-fort-smith/ Fri, 13 May 2022 05:08:37 +0000 https://www.frontierforts.org/college-of-engineering-and-community-partners-launch-ride-4-smilies-program-in-fort-smith/ Photo submitted Left to right: Reese Brewer, executive director of the Frontier Metropolitan Planning Organization; George McGill, Mayor of Fort Smith; and Suman Mitra, an assistant professor of civil engineering at the U of A, try out the bikes available through the RIDE 4 SMILIES bike-sharing project. FORT SMITH, Ark. – City […]]]>



Photo submitted

Left to right: Reese Brewer, executive director of the Frontier Metropolitan Planning Organization; George McGill, Mayor of Fort Smith; and Suman Mitra, an assistant professor of civil engineering at the U of A, try out the bikes available through the RIDE 4 SMILIES bike-sharing project.

FORT SMITH, Ark. – City officials, planners and U of A researchers gathered Thursday in North Fort Smith for the official launch of Ride 4 Smilies, a low-cost bike-sharing service being rolled out to areas where the majority of residents report not having a vehicle or access to reliable public transportation.

“We are thrilled to offer our residents the opportunity to experience the many benefits of cycling,” said Fort Smith Mayor George McGill. “Whether it’s picking up a few items at the convenience store or just taking a spin and enjoying the outdoors, bike sharing is a healthy way to travel.”

The partners established eight stations with shared bikes accessible using an app called Movatic. After downloading the app and creating an account, residents can scan a QR code on the bike, ride it where they need to go, then come back and lock it at the station.

Initially, one-hour rides will be free to encourage participation. Over time, researchers will test pricing and incentive strategies to develop a sustainable revenue model that balances profitability and affordability.

Supply chain issues have delayed the delivery of e-bikes, so the program will start using traditional bikes until e-bikes arrive.

Reese Brewer, director of the Frontier Metropolitan Planning Organization, said the group is eager to hear how the Smilies bike-sharing pilot program can provide the diverse communities north of Fort Smith with reliable, equitable and healthy transportation choices.

“The program should reflect the neighborhoods it will serve,” she said. “Rather than placing brand new, sparkling Smilies bikes in pre-determined locations, we intentionally sought out public feedback to indicate where the Smilies bike share would best meet the needs of the community. partner with the community and find the best model and structure of self-service bikes that change lives.”

The project is funded by a $1 million National Science Foundation grant to the U of A College of Engineering. The study is titled Shared micromobility for affordable and accessible housing.

In addition to Brewer, the co-principal investigators are Suman Mitra, assistant professor of civil engineering at the U of A; Sarah Hernandez, associate professor of civil engineering at the U of A; Rogelio Garcia Contreras, director of the social innovation program at the U of A Walton College of Business; and Elizabeth McClain, wellness manager at Arkansas Colleges of Health Education.

Mitra said he was thrilled to see the Ride 4 Smilies program launch after months of planning, research and data collection. He thanked the project team for their hard work over the past six months.

“I hope this bike share program helps those who need it most. We have tried to develop an inclusive and sustainable program tailored to the needs of Fort Smith residents,” he said. “As a researcher, I appreciate the opportunity to work with this great community. In the coming months, we will be developing models and collecting user data to assess the impact of the program on the livelihoods of the community. local community so that we can improve the system based on their needs and preferences.”

Other partners in the project include bike share provider Tandem Mobility, the City of Fort Smith and bike store Champion Cycling. More information about the program can be found on the project webpage or Tandem Mobility Mount 4 smileys page.

Partners participating in the research program stand by to share bikes

From left to right: Vuban Chowdhury, master’s student in civil engineering; Jeff Dingman, Deputy Director of Fort Smith; Suman Mitra, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering; Anindya Debnath, PhD in Civil Engineering. student; Doug Reinert, Director of Parks and Recreation Fort Smith; Reese Brewer, executive director of the Frontier Metropolitan Planning Organization; Stacy Willinger, transportation planner for the Frontier Metropolitan Planning Organization; Elizabeth McClain, wellness director for Arkansas Colleges of Health Education; and Isaac Salazar, Arkansas Colleges of Health Education Community Outreach Coordinator.

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Campus Clips: Partnerships Offer New Opportunities https://www.frontierforts.org/campus-clips-partnerships-offer-new-opportunities/ Wed, 11 May 2022 14:25:17 +0000 https://www.frontierforts.org/campus-clips-partnerships-offer-new-opportunities/ Concordia University, Nebraska (CUNE), Seward, Neb., and Creighton University College of Nursing, Omaha, Neb., have partnered to offer a dual degree program in biology and nursing. (CUNE) Nursing partnership Concordia University, Nebraska (CUNE), Seward, Neb.partnered with Creighton University in Omaha, Neb., to offer students the opportunity to receive both a Bachelor of Arts in Biology […]]]>
Concordia University, Nebraska (CUNE), Seward, Neb., and Creighton University College of Nursing, Omaha, Neb., have partnered to offer a dual degree program in biology and nursing. (CUNE)

Nursing partnership

Concordia University, Nebraska (CUNE), Seward, Neb.partnered with Creighton University in Omaha, Neb., to offer students the opportunity to receive both a Bachelor of Arts in Biology and an accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing while completing their college programs in four years in total.

Through this partnership, students will spend the first three years of the program at CUNE and the final year at Creighton’s Grand Island campus. Students can choose to stay in CUNE accommodation during the final year.

“This partnership with Creighton University will provide Concordia students with access to one of the most successful and longest running accelerated nursing programs in the country,” said Dr. Tim Preuss, Rector of CUNE. “Nursing is already Concordia’s main pre-health program. This partnership will allow students to continue their Christ-centered education at two nationally recognized Christian universities right here in Nebraska.

Learn more about cune.edu/nursing.

Rové visit

Karl Rove, former White House deputy chief of staff and senior adviser under President George W. Bush, visited Concordia University Wisconsin (CUW), Mequon, Wis., in March, giving CUW students a behind-the-scenes look at Washington, D.C. Rove, who helped Bush speak at the start of CUW in 2004, covered topics including the Russian invasion of Ukraine and the upcoming US election season. Read more on blog.cuw.edu/karl-rove.

New therapeutic space

Concordia University Ann Arbor (CUAA), Ann Arbor, Mich., remodeled its North Building to prepare for the upcoming launches of AUCU’s Doctor of Occupational Therapy and Doctor of Physical Therapy programs. These are the first doctoral programs to be offered on the Ann Arbor campus. The new space includes two classrooms and four laboratories, one of which includes an adapted kitchen and a washer/dryer for therapeutic purposes. Learn more about blog.cuaa.edu/ot-pt-remodel.

Graduates shine

Four graduates of Concordia University of Chicago, River Forest, Illinois., have been honored with the Lutheran Education Association (LEA) Awards, given annually to outstanding Lutheran teachers. Mark Bahr (BA ’82, MA ’88), Principal of Schools for the Lutheran High School Association of Greater Milwaukee, received the Christus Magister Award, LEA’s highest honor. Richard Cohrs (BA ’71) of St. Charles, Mo., received the Distinguished Retired Lutheran Educator EncourAGING Award. Julie (Luber) Weil (BA ’11), a teacher at Zion Lutheran School in Georgetown, Texas, has been named a Distinguished Lutheran Elementary Teacher. Daniel Sterling (BA ’86), a teacher at St. Paul’s Lutheran School in Des Peres, Mo., was named a Distinguished Lutheran Middle School Teacher.

Scholar of Goldwater

Averie Perez, junior at Concordia Irvine University (CUI), Irvine, CA., majoring in biochemistry, was named a 2022 Goldwater Scholar by the Barry Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Foundation. The Goldwater Scholarship, established by Congress in 1986 in honor of U.S. Senator Barry M. Goldwater, is awarded annually to the nation’s top undergraduate scholars in science, mathematics, and engineering. From an estimated pool of more than 5,000 applicants, 417 students received this year’s awards.

“Averie’s accomplishments are a testament so well to his drive, drive and academic accomplishments,” said Dr. Bret Taylor, Dean of the CUI School of Arts and Sciences.

Dr. John Kenney, Professor of Chemistry at CUI, said Perez is “truly and richly deserving of this scholarship in recognition of his dynamic enthusiasm, work ethic, can-do attitude and ambitious professional goals”.

At CUI, Perez researched treatment strategies for antibiotic and multi-drug resistance using zebrafish to determine the possible success of the treatment method. She is currently working on modifying the bacteria and breeding her fish at Concordia’s Marine Lab.

“I was so shocked when I won,” Perez said. “This award means I’m on the right path and gives me the confidence to pursue my career goals.” After graduation, Perez plans to pursue a doctorate. in cellular and molecular biology with a specialization in immunology and infectious diseases.

Mission and ministry

Concordia University, St. Paul (CSP), St. Paul, Minn., increases resources for mission and ministry through a variety of partnerships. Beginning in April, Reverend Dr. Mark Koschmann is co-teaching an online continuing education course, “Missional Leadership in the Urban Context,” in partnership with Concordia Seminary, St. Louis. In May, Reverend Dr. Joshua Hollmann will teach a course on “Mission and Ministry in Urban Contexts” for Concordia Lutheran Seminary in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. In June, the Center for Biblical Studies at CSP will serve as the host site for Concordia Theological Seminary, Fort Wayne, as Reverend Jeffrey Pulse teaches “The Joseph Narratives: A Tale of Two Brothers in Genesis 37–50” .

Seminar News

Concordia Seminary, Saint-Louis (CSL), and Concordia Theological Seminary, Fort Wayne (CTSFW), have partnered to implement a recently awarded $1 million grant from Lilly Endowment Inc. to establish a joint pastoral training project. The project is designed to assist theological schools across the United States and Canada as they seek to prepare future pastoral leaders for Christian congregations.

“I am grateful to Lilly Endowment for this generous grant and to President Rast and all of our friends at CTSFW for their commitment to this type of collaboration,” said CSL President Rev. Thomas J. Egger. “This grant application concept grew out of a meeting between our Seminary Administrations in May 2021, which identified the areas of student recruitment, faculty development, and continuing education as ripe for a leadership effort. team. These initiatives aim to provide more pastors and deaconesses to the church as we continue to strive for efficiency, excellence, and ethnic catholicity in our seminaries.

“The Lord tells us ‘the harvest is plentiful,’” said CTSFW President Rev. Dr. Lawrence R. Rast Jr. “We only have to look around to know it’s true. … In this project we intend to heed our Lord’s command to train more servants in Christ Jesus who can teach the faithful, reach the lost, and care for all. A partnership in this work will maximize the limited resources of both seminaries and serve to advance the gospel and global mission of LCMS.

Posted May 11, 2022

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14 years in prison for an engineer in a trade secrets case in China https://www.frontierforts.org/14-years-in-prison-for-an-engineer-in-a-trade-secrets-case-in-china/ Mon, 09 May 2022 22:38:27 +0000 https://www.frontierforts.org/14-years-in-prison-for-an-engineer-in-a-trade-secrets-case-in-china/ GREENEVILLE, Tenn. A chemical engineer has been sentenced to 14 years in prison for what prosecutors say was a scheme to steal trade secrets about materials used in soda cans and other beverages for the benefit of the Chinese government and a Chinese company. According to the US Department of Justice, Xiaorong “Shannon” You, 59, […]]]>

A chemical engineer has been sentenced to 14 years in prison for what prosecutors say was a scheme to steal trade secrets about materials used in soda cans and other beverages for the benefit of the Chinese government and a Chinese company.

According to the US Department of Justice, Xiaorong “Shannon” You, 59, of Lansing, Michigan, was sentenced by a federal judge in Greeneville, Tennessee on Monday after a jury found her guilty last month of charges that include possession of stolen trade secrets and economic espionage.

Prosecutors say you accessed secrets about BPA-free inner liners on beverage cans while working at Coca-Cola in Atlanta and Eastman Chemical Company in Kingsport, Tennessee. They say the trade secrets have cost major chemical and coatings companies nearly $120 million to develop.

Prosecutors say You stole trade secrets to establish a BPA-free coating business in China, and its Chinese partner, Weihai Jinhong Group, received millions of dollars in Chinese government grants to support the new venture.

Prosecutors pointed to evidence at trial to say that you also intended to benefit the governments of China, China’s Shandong Province, China’s Weihai City, and the Chinese Communist Party.

You worked at Coca-Cola as a senior engineer for global research from December 2012 to August 2017 and was responsible for packaging application development at Eastman Chemical from September 2017 to June 2018, prosecutors said.

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Ferrari moves into front row for inaugural Miami Grand Prix – WSVN 7News | Miami News, Weather, Sports https://www.frontierforts.org/ferrari-moves-into-front-row-for-inaugural-miami-grand-prix-wsvn-7news-miami-news-weather-sports/ Sat, 07 May 2022 22:36:12 +0000 https://www.frontierforts.org/ferrari-moves-into-front-row-for-inaugural-miami-grand-prix-wsvn-7news-miami-news-weather-sports/ MIAMI GARDENS, Fla. (AP) — Ferrari stormed to the front of the grid for the inaugural Miami Grand Prix as Formula One championship leader Charles Leclerc and teammate Carlos Sainz Jr. locked down the front row in qualifying on Saturday. It’s the first time Ferrari will lead the field on green in the United States […]]]>

MIAMI GARDENS, Fla. (AP) — Ferrari stormed to the front of the grid for the inaugural Miami Grand Prix as Formula One championship leader Charles Leclerc and teammate Carlos Sainz Jr. locked down the front row in qualifying on Saturday.

It’s the first time Ferrari will lead the field on green in the United States since Michael Schumacher took pole at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in 2006. It’s the front row ahead of this season for Sainz, who was overqualified by Leclerc within five sessions.

Leclerc won three poles this year ahead of Sunday, F1’s first race on the purpose-built circuit around the Hard Rock Stadium. The race marks the first of two this year in the United States – which has not hosted two F1 races in the same year since 1984.

Leclerc turned to the roaring crowd and saluted while being interviewed by retired IndyCar and NASCAR driver Danica Patrick.

“The fans are crazy. It’s amazing to be here in the United States and see how much support has grown over the past few years,” Leclerc said. “I saw so many people in the stands. It definitely motivates us.

Reigning world champion Max Verstappen led the final qualifying segment until the Dutchman made a rare mistake and both Ferraris edged him out in the dying seconds. He will leave third Sunday; Leclerc and Verstappen shared the first four races, two wins each.

“It’s quite slippery outside the normal racing line, but we’ll see. A lot can happen,” Verstappen said.

Sergio Perez finished fourth as Red Bull locked down the second row. Earlier on Saturday, Red Bull boss Christian Horner denied a rumor that the team was planning to sign Fernando Alonso for 2023 and said talks over an extension for Perez would begin during F1’s summer break. .

“Checo is doing a great job. He drives at a very high level. He’s more comfortable on the team this year,” Horner said. “We are satisfied with the work he is doing. However, we’ve only seen a sample of four races, so it’s still early in the year.

Valtteri Bottas qualified fifth, one place ahead of former Mercedes team-mate Lewis Hamilton. Bottas was replaced this year at Mercedes by George Russell, leading to speculation at Imola two weeks ago that Bottas had a grudge based on his late-race battle with Russell for the position.

“No, it’s points, I was looking for points and always really trying to maximize every opportunity, every position you can take,” Bottas said. “The goal was more points rather than a person.”

Hamilton qualified sixth in a small improvement for Mercedes, which has struggled since launching its new car. He outqualified Russell, who was fastest in Friday’s second practice session, but failed to make it out of the second lap and finished 12th.

“I just don’t think I have confidence in the car today,” Russell told his Mercedes team via radio.

Hamilton, meanwhile, had both former First Lady Michelle Obama and director George Lucas watching from his pit. Hamilton had a rocky weekend opener when he arrived at the venue on Friday wearing all the jewelry he could put on to protest the FIA’s new crackdown on wearing bling during competition.

Hamilton said he had piercings he couldn’t remove and was willing to sign a liability waiver. The FIA, F1’s governing body, says the jewelry is a safety hazard. On Saturday, he amended the ban to include wristwatches.

“Clearly the regulations are there to protect drivers; on the other side, we have to keep the possibility of diversity and means of expression and of expressing oneself,” said Mercedes boss Toto Wolff. “And we know it’s important to Lewis, so without going into detail where the piercing stayed…I’m sure they’ll come to a good resolution.”

It was a disappointing weekend for Haas F1, the team owned by California businessman Gene Haas, which also owns a NASCAR team with Tony Stewart. The team has improved a lot at the start of this season compared to last year when Haas was worst on the grid and failed to score a single point all year.

But in qualifying, Kevin Magnussen, who has 15 points from the first four races, failed to make it out of the opening lap. Mick Schumacher qualified for the second round but qualified only 15th, one place ahead of Magnussen, and ‘the American F1 team’ will have a long drive on Sunday to impress the expected 85,000 spectators.

At least half of the IndyCar paddock is in Miami for the event and that includes Michael Andretti and his father, 1978 F1 champion Mario Andretti. Michael Andretti failed last year to buy an existing F1 team and has since called for its expansion to create a new two-car team.

He received no response from the FIA ​​or Liberty Media, the American company that owns F1. Andretti wants to bring Colton Herta, a 22-year-old IndyCar driver from California, to F1, but Herta has signed a test contract with McLaren as Andretti awaits his fate.

The paddock did not seem eager to welcome two new cars to the grid anytime soon, as Wolff said on Saturday he was against stock market dilution and other team principals stressed the expansion should only happen. do that if the team was planning a legitimate effort.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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As Diversity Grows, US Boards Remain Disproportionately White https://www.frontierforts.org/as-diversity-grows-us-boards-remain-disproportionately-white/ Fri, 06 May 2022 06:21:17 +0000 https://www.frontierforts.org/as-diversity-grows-us-boards-remain-disproportionately-white/ FILE – In this Aug. 25, 2020, file photo, the bronze sculpture “Fearless Girl,” commissioned by State Street Global Advisors, gazes toward the New York Stock Exchange from its roadside perch in New York City. Amid pressure to make America’s boardrooms look more like corporate customers and employees, advocates are finally seeing just how daunting […]]]>

FILE - In this Aug. 25, 2020, file photo, the bronze sculpture

FILE – In this Aug. 25, 2020, file photo, the bronze sculpture “Fearless Girl,” commissioned by State Street Global Advisors, gazes toward the New York Stock Exchange from its roadside perch in New York City. Amid pressure to make America’s boardrooms look more like corporate customers and employees, advocates are finally seeing just how daunting the task will be. Boards of publicly traded American companies are much whiter and much less diverse than the general population, often in stark ways. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)

PA

Amid pressure to make America’s boardrooms look more like corporate customers and employees, advocates are finally seeing just how daunting the task will be.

Boards of publicly traded American companies are much whiter and much less diverse than the general population, often in stark ways. For example, only 2.7% of directors at the start of the year were Hispanic. This should climb to 18.5% to reflect the US population.

Outside of looking at a picture of every director, measuring racial diversity on boards hasn’t always been easy. On Thursday, executive data firm Equilar released its first racial breakdown of the boards of directors of companies in the Russell 3000 Index, which covers around 97% of all investable US stocks.

The survey found that only 6.2% of directors are black, compared to 13.4% nationwide. And the 5% of directors of Asian or Pacific Islander origin is also lower than the 6.1% for the entire American population.

Equilar pulled the numbers from a variety of sources, including company disclosures, affiliate network data, and lists of influential racial and ethnic minority leaders. Its results are similar to the disproportionate representation found in other surveys of smaller groups.

Executive search firm Heidrick & Struggles released its roundup of the boards of a smaller group of companies, those in the Fortune 500, earlier this week. It found that black directors hold 26% seats on the board, while Asian or Asian American directors had 9% and Hispanic directors held 6%.

Larger companies tend to have more diverse boards of directors than smaller companies. But more and more at all levels are being transparent about the racial breakdown of their board. A big reason for this is that they are forced into it, under pressure from exchanges, regulators and investors.

At Nasdaq, for example, U.S. securities regulators last summer approved a rule requiring companies listed on its U.S. stock exchange to file an annual document detailing the racial and ethnic origins of their directors, among other demographics. The Nasdaq even has a fillable PDF form to make it easier for companies to submit the data by Aug. 8 or whenever they file their 2022 proxy statement, whichever is later.

By August 7, 2023, the Nasdaq will require a publicly traded company to have at least one director who is considered “miscellaneous” or to explain why it is not.

Investors are making similar efforts, arguing that more diverse boards lead to more perspectives and better decision-making. They want boards to be more like their employees and clients, who are becoming increasingly diverse with the country’s trends, to better understand them.

“If you’re an investor, you’re looking for ways for companies to outperform,” said Ann Miletti, who is both chief diversity officer and head of active stocks at Allspring Global Investments. “We generally agree that the more diversity you have on your board, the better performance you will achieve in the long run.”

The push for more racial and ethnic diversity on corporate boards follows years of a primary focus on gender. Thursday’s figures from Equilar show how racially and ethnically minority women are among the least represented on corporate boards. Only 0.9% of US directors are Hispanic women, for example, half of the already low 1.8% for Hispanic men.

Some of the requirements to increase diversity met with strong resistance. California, for example, passed a law in 2020 requiring companies with main offices in the state to have a minimum number of directors from an underrepresented community. This includes people who identify as black, Hispanic, Asian, gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender.

Earlier this year, a California state court ruled the requirement unconstitutional following a claim that it violated California’s Equal Protection Clause. The judge wrote in his ruling that the state should have considered other options for achieving greater board diversity before imposing it.

Those requirements ended up increasing racial diversity on boards, but unevenly, said Vicki Bogan, a professor at Cornell University’s SC Johnson College of Business.

His research found that board nominations increased significantly for directors of Asian, Middle Eastern and North African descent after the California law was signed. But the number of nominations for black directors hasn’t changed. That’s likely because California companies were substituting applicants from the first group for the second to comply with the rule, she said.

Bogan said the 2020 killing of George Floyd had a bigger effect, especially for the appointment of black directors.

All American companies have shown an increased likelihood of appointing a black person to their board following the forced recognition of racism across America, she said. But companies that had no black directors had an even higher probability.

“I think it’s too early to say whether it’s temporary or not,” she said. “What I can share is that I hope that’s not the case. I hope we are on the right path to having more councils that are more representative of the population.”

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Hundreds Attend 22 | News, Sports, Jobs https://www.frontierforts.org/hundreds-attend-22-news-sports-jobs/ Wed, 04 May 2022 06:21:16 +0000 https://www.frontierforts.org/hundreds-attend-22-news-sports-jobs/ Hardy and Sheila Silcox, who have been married for 63 years, at the Pioneer Picnic at the Lee Civic Center on Saturday. They were the longest married couple. Hardy and Sheila Silcox, who have been married for 63 years, at the Pioneer Picnic at the Lee Civic Center on Saturday. They […]]]>



Hardy and Sheila Silcox, who have been married for 63 years, at the Pioneer Picnic at the Lee Civic Center on Saturday. They were the longest married couple.

They remember when Fort Myers ended in Colonial when it was a dirt road.

They remember the time when the city center was the center of social life, with three or four theaters.

They remember each other and what a different place Lee County was when it had a small town feel and everyone knew each other.

Nearly 700 of these people sharing memories came from all over to the Tinsley Pavilion at the Lee Civic Center on Saturday to come together and reminisce about the Pioneer Picnic, which was held for the first time in three years after COVID canceled the gatherings planned for 2020 and 2021. .

The event, hosted by the Pioneer Club of Lee County, was experienced in Lee County at least 50 years ago. The event began in 1950 to celebrate those who were in the county all those years.

James Sciple, 97, talks to Lin Bochette at the Pioneer Picnic at the Lee Civic Center on Saturday. Sciple was the oldest person at the picnic.

Pat Mann, who chaired the event, said he was worried many people would show up – and he was glad so many people came.

“COVID has been tough on us, but it’s nice to see the turnout. We had planned 700 and it looks like we are full. It’s about getting together, hugging a friend, shaking their hand and being there with their friends,” Mann said.

Due to the hiatus, all high school classes of 1970, 1971, and 1972 were honored. Randy Parrish, of the Fort Myers Class of 1971, said he hadn’t been to the event in a few years, but wanted to come and celebrate a 50-year reunion that hadn’t happened the last year.

“It’s good to see a lot of people who have been here so long because normally you don’t meet them. It’s good to have them in a congregation like this. Parris said. “I remember when downtown was where everyone went to shop. We had Sears and Belk’s and the Edison, Lee and Arcade theatres. It was Fort Myers. I miss it.”

Parrish said most people don’t understand what this area looked like decades ago because it has grown so much. Debbie Burks, North Fort Myers Class of 1972, and her cousin, Michelle Burks-Grimm, Class of 1987, remembered a smaller Fort Myers.

“It was a great school and a great town to grow up in. I lived on Durrance Road when it was dirt and that’s where I lived when I was 5 until high school,” Burks said. “Most of these people are from here and they see how important this has become.”

“I love being here. This is a beautiful city. I am proud to be from this area and we have seen it grow over the years. As big as it is, the heart of Fort Myers is still there and it’s great to see all these people who are natives coming together,” said Burks-Grimm. “I think everyone wanted to come see each other again.”

Charles Watson, Class of 1953, was Principal of Alva Middle School and is amazed at how much the area has changed.

“I get lost trying to find my way here. These are all trailer parks and apartment complexes and I don’t know where all these people are from,” said Watson. “My promotion only had 153 people. There were only three or four high schools, and Boca Grande only had three graduates and Alva had about five.

Pam Pritchett-Naylor, Class of 1968, was with some of her neighborhood friends, who remembered the old days a lot.

Lee Sapp O’Hare, Class of 1961, at the Pioneer Picnic at the Lee Civic Center on Saturday. Sapp O’Hare came over from Alaska for the picnic.

“We remember when Colonial was a dirt road, with potato farms on either side. My dad was in real estate and my friend’s dad was a Coca-Cola bottler,” said Pritchett-Naylor. “It’s changed so much, but when you put all these people together, old Fort Myers is still there.”

Stephanie Sirianni, whose father and brother coach legends at Fort Myers High School, said her parents came to the area from West Virginia instead of playing AA baseball for the Pittsburgh Pirates. After briefly returning to West Virginia, they returned to stay.

“They love the Green Wave. They came here in 1967 and we have been here ever since. It is the house. My brother and I were both born here and it’s a great place to grow up and raise your family. Sirianni said. “My father didn’t want to be associated with just one school. He cared a lot about youth and was involved in many things.

The event also honored the oldest man and woman and the oldest couple. Katherine Ingram-Nolan was the oldest woman at 93, while James Sciple, 97 and a World War II veteran, was the oldest man. Hardy and Sheila Silcox were one of three couples who had been married for 63 years, but won the tiebreaker when they were split in months.

While most of those who attended still live in Lee County, a few traveled from elsewhere. Lee Sapp O’Hare, Class of 1961, is from Alaska.

The North Fort Myers High School JROTC Color Guard march during the Pioneer Picnic at the Lee Civic Center on Saturday.

“I used to live in Fairbanks, but now I live in a fishing community. I was born here and my parents had a business here, Tice Supermarket. I was the first twin born at Lee Memorial Hospital,” Sapp O’Hare said. “I come back because I grew up here and my best friends are still here.”


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Morgan Properties enters the Build-to-Rent space https://www.frontierforts.org/morgan-properties-enters-the-build-to-rent-space/ Mon, 02 May 2022 18:04:36 +0000 https://www.frontierforts.org/morgan-properties-enters-the-build-to-rent-space/ MCKINNEY, TX – National real estate investment and management firm Morgan Properties has entered build-to-let space with the purchase of a newly constructed 136-unit single-family rental community in McKinney, TX. The transaction represents Morgan Properties’ first build-to-let acquisition and its third rental community in Texas. “For nearly four decades, Morgan Properties has primarily focused on […]]]>

MCKINNEY, TX – National real estate investment and management firm Morgan Properties has entered build-to-let space with the purchase of a newly constructed 136-unit single-family rental community in McKinney, TX.

The transaction represents Morgan Properties’ first build-to-let acquisition and its third rental community in Texas.

“For nearly four decades, Morgan Properties has primarily focused on acquiring larger, Class B multi-family portfolios where we can add our value-added expertise and create operational efficiencies,” says Jonathan Morgan, President of Morgan Properties. JV. “While these opportunistic multi-family investments remain our primary focus, we also see a huge opportunity to partner with developers in the build-to-let market and capitalize on the growing popularity among renters of single-family homes that allow for more housing. space and privacy.

The company has acquired the luxurious build-to-let community, parcHaus at Skyline, from Dallas-based Provident Realty Advisors. Morgan Properties will rebrand the community as Elevate at Skyline.

Located outside of the Dallas-Fort Worth area, Elevate at Skyline offers one-, two-, and three-bedroom units. Homes offer private backyards, smart thermostats and locks, Energy Star appliances, built-in washers and dryers, and modern finishes. The gated community also offers a pickleball court, swimming pool, dog park, business center and covered parking and garage.

The community offers direct access to Interstate 380 and Interstate 75, and is located near shopping destinations and business centers, such as the Raytheon Campus and Allen Premium Outlets, as well as local airports and international.

“Single-family rental homes are in high demand in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, especially in cities that offer a desirable quality of life, top-notch school districts, and strong employer base like McKinney, TX,” says Jason Morgan, Director and President of Special Situations at Morgan Properties. “It made the acquisition of Elevate at Skyline an easy decision for us, and one that will kick-start our future interest in diversifying our portfolio through single-family rental communities, while continuing to grow our presence in the thriving Sun Belt region.”

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